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Family history and risk of kidney stones.

Abstract

Kidney stones develop more frequently in individuals with a family history of kidney stones than in those without a family history; however, little information is available regarding whether the increased risk is attributable to genetic factors, environmental exposures, or some combination. In this report, the relation between family history and risk of kidney stone formation was studied in a cohort of 37,999 male participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Information on family history, kidney stone formation, and other exposures of interest, including dietary intake, was obtained by mailed questionnaires. A family history of kidney stones was much more common in men with a personal history of stones at baseline in 1986 than in those without a history of stones (age-adjusted prevalence odds ratio, 3.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.90 to 3.45). During 8 yr of follow-up, 795 incident cases of stones were documented. After adjusting for a variety of risk factors, the relative risk of incident stone formation in men with a positive family history, compared with those without, was 2.57 (95% CI, 2.19 to 3.02). Family history did not modify the inverse association between dietary calcium intake and the risk of stone formation. These results suggest that a family history of kidney stones substantially increases the risk of stone formation. In addition, these data suggest that dietary calcium restriction may increase the risk of stone formation, even among individuals with a family history of kidney stones.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Calcium
    Calcium, Dietary
    Diet
    Drinking
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Kidney Calculi
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9335385

    Citation

    Curhan, G C., et al. "Family History and Risk of Kidney Stones." Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 8, no. 10, 1997, pp. 1568-73.
    Curhan GC, Willett WC, Rimm EB, et al. Family history and risk of kidney stones. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1997;8(10):1568-73.
    Curhan, G. C., Willett, W. C., Rimm, E. B., & Stampfer, M. J. (1997). Family history and risk of kidney stones. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 8(10), pp. 1568-73.
    Curhan GC, et al. Family History and Risk of Kidney Stones. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1997;8(10):1568-73. PubMed PMID: 9335385.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Family history and risk of kidney stones. AU - Curhan,G C, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Stampfer,M J, PY - 1997/10/23/pubmed PY - 1997/10/23/medline PY - 1997/10/23/entrez SP - 1568 EP - 73 JF - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN JO - J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. VL - 8 IS - 10 N2 - Kidney stones develop more frequently in individuals with a family history of kidney stones than in those without a family history; however, little information is available regarding whether the increased risk is attributable to genetic factors, environmental exposures, or some combination. In this report, the relation between family history and risk of kidney stone formation was studied in a cohort of 37,999 male participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Information on family history, kidney stone formation, and other exposures of interest, including dietary intake, was obtained by mailed questionnaires. A family history of kidney stones was much more common in men with a personal history of stones at baseline in 1986 than in those without a history of stones (age-adjusted prevalence odds ratio, 3.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.90 to 3.45). During 8 yr of follow-up, 795 incident cases of stones were documented. After adjusting for a variety of risk factors, the relative risk of incident stone formation in men with a positive family history, compared with those without, was 2.57 (95% CI, 2.19 to 3.02). Family history did not modify the inverse association between dietary calcium intake and the risk of stone formation. These results suggest that a family history of kidney stones substantially increases the risk of stone formation. In addition, these data suggest that dietary calcium restriction may increase the risk of stone formation, even among individuals with a family history of kidney stones. SN - 1046-6673 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9335385/Family_history_and_risk_of_kidney_stones_ L2 - http://jasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=9335385 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -