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Effect of pyridostigmine on the thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in abstinent alcoholics.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1997 Oct; 21(7):1308-11.AC

Abstract

Alcoholism is sometimes associated with a blunted thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; peak minus baseline < 5 mIU/liter), despite basal TSH and thyroid hormone levels within the normal range. In light of the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on TSH secretion, we examined whether this condition is caused by an increased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in alcoholic subjects. To answer this question, 16 euthyroid male alcoholics (aged 38 to 50 years) with normal [n = 8; normal responder alcoholics (NRAs)] or blunted [n = 8; low responder alcoholics (LRAs)] TSH response to TRH were selected in a preliminary TRH test (200 micrograms in an intravenous bolus). In addition, 8 age- and weight-matched normal men were tested with TRH and used as normal controls (NCs). NCs and alcoholic patients showed similar basal serum TSH, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels. All subjects were tested again with TRH, 60 min after treatment with 180 mg of pyridostigmine orally. According to selection criteria, NCs and NRA groups showed similar TSH responses to TRH, whereas TRH-induced TSH rise was strikingly lower in LRAs than in NCs and the NRA group. Pyridostigmine did not change the basal levels of TSH in any group, whereas it enhanced in a similar manner the TRH-induced TSH rise in the NC and NRA groups. No significant change in the TSH response to TRH was observed in LRA patients after pyridostigmine treatment. These data argue against the possibility that an enhanced somatostatinergic tone is responsible for the blunted TSH response to TRH observed in some alcoholic patients. This phenomenon might be attributed to alcohol-related defects of stimulated pituitary thyrotroph secretory capacity in some individuals, possibly due to genetic vulnerability and/or the toxic effects of prolonged alcohol abuse.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Alcohology-Institute of Internal Medicine, University of Parma, Italy.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9347094

Citation

Coiro, V, and P P. Vescovi. "Effect of Pyridostigmine On the Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Response to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone in Abstinent Alcoholics." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 21, no. 7, 1997, pp. 1308-11.
Coiro V, Vescovi PP. Effect of pyridostigmine on the thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in abstinent alcoholics. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1997;21(7):1308-11.
Coiro, V., & Vescovi, P. P. (1997). Effect of pyridostigmine on the thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in abstinent alcoholics. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 21(7), 1308-11.
Coiro V, Vescovi PP. Effect of Pyridostigmine On the Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Response to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone in Abstinent Alcoholics. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1997;21(7):1308-11. PubMed PMID: 9347094.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of pyridostigmine on the thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in abstinent alcoholics. AU - Coiro,V, AU - Vescovi,P P, PY - 1997/11/5/pubmed PY - 1997/11/5/medline PY - 1997/11/5/entrez SP - 1308 EP - 11 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 21 IS - 7 N2 - Alcoholism is sometimes associated with a blunted thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; peak minus baseline < 5 mIU/liter), despite basal TSH and thyroid hormone levels within the normal range. In light of the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on TSH secretion, we examined whether this condition is caused by an increased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in alcoholic subjects. To answer this question, 16 euthyroid male alcoholics (aged 38 to 50 years) with normal [n = 8; normal responder alcoholics (NRAs)] or blunted [n = 8; low responder alcoholics (LRAs)] TSH response to TRH were selected in a preliminary TRH test (200 micrograms in an intravenous bolus). In addition, 8 age- and weight-matched normal men were tested with TRH and used as normal controls (NCs). NCs and alcoholic patients showed similar basal serum TSH, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels. All subjects were tested again with TRH, 60 min after treatment with 180 mg of pyridostigmine orally. According to selection criteria, NCs and NRA groups showed similar TSH responses to TRH, whereas TRH-induced TSH rise was strikingly lower in LRAs than in NCs and the NRA group. Pyridostigmine did not change the basal levels of TSH in any group, whereas it enhanced in a similar manner the TRH-induced TSH rise in the NC and NRA groups. No significant change in the TSH response to TRH was observed in LRA patients after pyridostigmine treatment. These data argue against the possibility that an enhanced somatostatinergic tone is responsible for the blunted TSH response to TRH observed in some alcoholic patients. This phenomenon might be attributed to alcohol-related defects of stimulated pituitary thyrotroph secretory capacity in some individuals, possibly due to genetic vulnerability and/or the toxic effects of prolonged alcohol abuse. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9347094/Effect_of_pyridostigmine_on_the_thyroid_stimulating_hormone_response_to_thyrotropin_releasing_hormone_in_abstinent_alcoholics_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0145-6008&amp;date=1997&amp;volume=21&amp;issue=7&amp;spage=1308 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -