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Lead poisoning--a hazard of traffic and industries in Pakistan.
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1995; 14(2):117-20.JE

Abstract

We measured blood lead level, hemoglobin, and urinary amino-levulinic acid (ALA) in industrial workers and in individuals exposed to vehicle smoke. Industrial workers and people exposed to traffic smoke had comparatively higher blood lead levels than the controls (p < 0.0001). Similarly, urinary ALA was 3.82 mg/dL in industrial subjects, 3.68 mg/dL in traffic-exposed people, and 0.8 mg/dL in control subjects (p < 0.001). The hemoglobin level was lower in the industrial group and in the traffic exposure group compared with the control group (p < 0.01). Traffic smoke-exposed persons, such as traffic police staff, had higher blood lead level than those handling lead material, Government Transport Service (GTS) workshop staff. The length of exposure showed no relationship with the lead levels. However, a positive correlation was observed between the duration of exposure and urinary ALA in both sample groups. The major signs and symptoms of the population studied included headache, generalized body pain, hypertension, and depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Centre, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, Pakistan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9372841

Citation

Khan, M H., et al. "Lead Poisoning--a Hazard of Traffic and Industries in Pakistan." Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology : Official Organ of the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer, vol. 14, no. 2, 1995, pp. 117-20.
Khan MH, Khan I, Shah SH, et al. Lead poisoning--a hazard of traffic and industries in Pakistan. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1995;14(2):117-20.
Khan, M. H., Khan, I., Shah, S. H., & Rashid, Q. (1995). Lead poisoning--a hazard of traffic and industries in Pakistan. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology : Official Organ of the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer, 14(2), 117-20.
Khan MH, et al. Lead Poisoning--a Hazard of Traffic and Industries in Pakistan. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1995;14(2):117-20. PubMed PMID: 9372841.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lead poisoning--a hazard of traffic and industries in Pakistan. AU - Khan,M H, AU - Khan,I, AU - Shah,S H, AU - Rashid,Q, PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 1997/12/31/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez SP - 117 EP - 20 JF - Journal of environmental pathology, toxicology and oncology : official organ of the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer JO - J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - We measured blood lead level, hemoglobin, and urinary amino-levulinic acid (ALA) in industrial workers and in individuals exposed to vehicle smoke. Industrial workers and people exposed to traffic smoke had comparatively higher blood lead levels than the controls (p < 0.0001). Similarly, urinary ALA was 3.82 mg/dL in industrial subjects, 3.68 mg/dL in traffic-exposed people, and 0.8 mg/dL in control subjects (p < 0.001). The hemoglobin level was lower in the industrial group and in the traffic exposure group compared with the control group (p < 0.01). Traffic smoke-exposed persons, such as traffic police staff, had higher blood lead level than those handling lead material, Government Transport Service (GTS) workshop staff. The length of exposure showed no relationship with the lead levels. However, a positive correlation was observed between the duration of exposure and urinary ALA in both sample groups. The major signs and symptoms of the population studied included headache, generalized body pain, hypertension, and depression. SN - 0731-8898 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9372841/Lead_poisoning__a_hazard_of_traffic_and_industries_in_Pakistan_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -