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Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and high density lipoprotein cholesterol in mice: modulation by cholesteryl ester transfer protein and dietary status.
J Lipid Res. 1997 Oct; 38(10):2079-89.JL

Abstract

Plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity correlates with high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels in humans. However, in several mouse models created either through transgenesis or targeted inactivation of LPL, no significant changes in HDL cholesterol values have been evident. One possible explanation for this species difference could be the absence of plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity in mice. To explore this possibility and further investigate interactions between LPL and CETP modulating HDL cholesterol levels in vivo, we examined the relationship between LPL activity and HDL levels in mice expressing the simian CETP transgene, compared with littermates not carrying the CETP gene. On a chow diet, increasing LPL activity was associated with a trend towards increased HDL levels (51 +/- 29 vs. 31 +/- 4 mg/dL highest vs. lowest tertiles of LPL activity, P = 0.07) in mice expressing CETP, while no such effects were seen in the absence of CETP (65 +/- 12 vs. 61 +/- 15 mg/ dL). Furthermore, in the presence of CETP, a significant positive correlation between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol was evident (r = 0.15, P = 0.006), while in the absence of CETP no such correlation was detected (r = 0.15, P = 0.36), highlighting the interactions between LPL and CETP in vivo. When mice were challenged with a high fat, high carbohydrate diet, strong correlations between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol were seen in both the presence (r = 0.45, P = 0.03) and absence (r = 0.73, P < 0.001) of CETP. Therefore, under altered metabolic contexts, such as those induced by dietary challenge, the relation between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol may also become evident. Here we have shown that both genetic and environmental factors may modulate the association between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol, and provide explanations for the absence of any changes in HDL values in mice either transgenic or with targeted disruption of the LPL gene.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9374130

Citation

Clee, S M., et al. "Relationship Between Lipoprotein Lipase and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Mice: Modulation By Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein and Dietary Status." Journal of Lipid Research, vol. 38, no. 10, 1997, pp. 2079-89.
Clee SM, Zhang H, Bissada N, et al. Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and high density lipoprotein cholesterol in mice: modulation by cholesteryl ester transfer protein and dietary status. J Lipid Res. 1997;38(10):2079-89.
Clee, S. M., Zhang, H., Bissada, N., Miao, L., Ehrenborg, E., Benlian, P., Shen, G. X., Angel, A., LeBoeuf, R. C., & Hayden, M. R. (1997). Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and high density lipoprotein cholesterol in mice: modulation by cholesteryl ester transfer protein and dietary status. Journal of Lipid Research, 38(10), 2079-89.
Clee SM, et al. Relationship Between Lipoprotein Lipase and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Mice: Modulation By Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein and Dietary Status. J Lipid Res. 1997;38(10):2079-89. PubMed PMID: 9374130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and high density lipoprotein cholesterol in mice: modulation by cholesteryl ester transfer protein and dietary status. AU - Clee,S M, AU - Zhang,H, AU - Bissada,N, AU - Miao,L, AU - Ehrenborg,E, AU - Benlian,P, AU - Shen,G X, AU - Angel,A, AU - LeBoeuf,R C, AU - Hayden,M R, PY - 1997/11/28/pubmed PY - 1997/11/28/medline PY - 1997/11/28/entrez SP - 2079 EP - 89 JF - Journal of lipid research JO - J Lipid Res VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - Plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity correlates with high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels in humans. However, in several mouse models created either through transgenesis or targeted inactivation of LPL, no significant changes in HDL cholesterol values have been evident. One possible explanation for this species difference could be the absence of plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity in mice. To explore this possibility and further investigate interactions between LPL and CETP modulating HDL cholesterol levels in vivo, we examined the relationship between LPL activity and HDL levels in mice expressing the simian CETP transgene, compared with littermates not carrying the CETP gene. On a chow diet, increasing LPL activity was associated with a trend towards increased HDL levels (51 +/- 29 vs. 31 +/- 4 mg/dL highest vs. lowest tertiles of LPL activity, P = 0.07) in mice expressing CETP, while no such effects were seen in the absence of CETP (65 +/- 12 vs. 61 +/- 15 mg/ dL). Furthermore, in the presence of CETP, a significant positive correlation between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol was evident (r = 0.15, P = 0.006), while in the absence of CETP no such correlation was detected (r = 0.15, P = 0.36), highlighting the interactions between LPL and CETP in vivo. When mice were challenged with a high fat, high carbohydrate diet, strong correlations between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol were seen in both the presence (r = 0.45, P = 0.03) and absence (r = 0.73, P < 0.001) of CETP. Therefore, under altered metabolic contexts, such as those induced by dietary challenge, the relation between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol may also become evident. Here we have shown that both genetic and environmental factors may modulate the association between LPL activity and HDL cholesterol, and provide explanations for the absence of any changes in HDL values in mice either transgenic or with targeted disruption of the LPL gene. SN - 0022-2275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9374130/Relationship_between_lipoprotein_lipase_and_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_in_mice:_modulation_by_cholesteryl_ester_transfer_protein_and_dietary_status_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-2275(20)37138-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -