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Linguistic maturity as a determinant of child patient behavior in the dental office.
ASDC J Dent Child. 1997 Sep-Oct; 64(5):322-6.AJ

Abstract

Progressively during the 20th century dentistry for children has become more efficient, less painful, and more prevention oriented. In the last quarter of the 20th century there was a dramatic decrease in dental decay for many American children. These two facts paired with the fact that stories about dentistry being painful are gone in many American communities and have been replaced with stories about how pleasant the dental appointment can be would seem to predict that child patient management and the interception of inappropriate behavior would not be a critical skill for the dental clinician that treats children today. This finding however is not the case. It is submitted that misbehavior now stems from the fact that today's parents are not encouraged to raise their children as urgently as in the earlier part of the century. It is offered that the child's incompetence in working with other people in the constituent speech acts of requests and promises causes the child confusion, frustration, and perhaps anxiety. The child's dental experience is a complex conversation between the dentists as requester and the child patient as the promisor of effective actions to the dentists' reasonable requests.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Iowa, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Iowa City 52242, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9391708

Citation

Pinkham, J R.. "Linguistic Maturity as a Determinant of Child Patient Behavior in the Dental Office." ASDC Journal of Dentistry for Children, vol. 64, no. 5, 1997, pp. 322-6.
Pinkham JR. Linguistic maturity as a determinant of child patient behavior in the dental office. ASDC J Dent Child. 1997;64(5):322-6.
Pinkham, J. R. (1997). Linguistic maturity as a determinant of child patient behavior in the dental office. ASDC Journal of Dentistry for Children, 64(5), 322-6.
Pinkham JR. Linguistic Maturity as a Determinant of Child Patient Behavior in the Dental Office. ASDC J Dent Child. 1997 Sep-Oct;64(5):322-6. PubMed PMID: 9391708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Linguistic maturity as a determinant of child patient behavior in the dental office. A1 - Pinkham,J R, PY - 1997/12/10/pubmed PY - 1997/12/10/medline PY - 1997/12/10/entrez SP - 322 EP - 6 JF - ASDC journal of dentistry for children JO - ASDC J Dent Child VL - 64 IS - 5 N2 - Progressively during the 20th century dentistry for children has become more efficient, less painful, and more prevention oriented. In the last quarter of the 20th century there was a dramatic decrease in dental decay for many American children. These two facts paired with the fact that stories about dentistry being painful are gone in many American communities and have been replaced with stories about how pleasant the dental appointment can be would seem to predict that child patient management and the interception of inappropriate behavior would not be a critical skill for the dental clinician that treats children today. This finding however is not the case. It is submitted that misbehavior now stems from the fact that today's parents are not encouraged to raise their children as urgently as in the earlier part of the century. It is offered that the child's incompetence in working with other people in the constituent speech acts of requests and promises causes the child confusion, frustration, and perhaps anxiety. The child's dental experience is a complex conversation between the dentists as requester and the child patient as the promisor of effective actions to the dentists' reasonable requests. SN - 1945-1954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9391708/Linguistic_maturity_as_a_determinant_of_child_patient_behavior_in_the_dental_office_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/toddlerdevelopment.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -