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Health behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities: results from the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey.
J Am Coll Health. 1997 Nov; 46(3):109-17.JA

Abstract

The National College Health Risk Behavior Survey was administered to a convenience sample of students at 8 historically Black colleges and universities in 7 states. Analyses showed major differences in the men's and women's responses. The men were significantly more likely than the women to be current smokers. Also, they more frequently reported heavy drinking, drinking and driving in the past days 30 days, and carrying a weapon. The women were significantly more likely to view themselves as overweight, and more than one third reported they were trying to lose weight. More than one third of the students had not exercised or participated in sports activities for more than 20 minutes in the past 7 days. Because historically Black colleges and universities educate the majority of undergraduate Black college students, multidimensional programs to promote disease prevention and health promotion for Black college students must be expanded and evaluated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Education, Health and Sport Studies, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9394088

Citation

Fennell, R. "Health Behaviors of Students Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Results From the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey." Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, vol. 46, no. 3, 1997, pp. 109-17.
Fennell R. Health behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities: results from the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey. J Am Coll Health. 1997;46(3):109-17.
Fennell, R. (1997). Health behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities: results from the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey. Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, 46(3), 109-17.
Fennell R. Health Behaviors of Students Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Results From the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey. J Am Coll Health. 1997;46(3):109-17. PubMed PMID: 9394088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities: results from the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey. A1 - Fennell,R, PY - 1997/12/12/pubmed PY - 1997/12/12/medline PY - 1997/12/12/entrez SP - 109 EP - 17 JF - Journal of American college health : J of ACH JO - J Am Coll Health VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - The National College Health Risk Behavior Survey was administered to a convenience sample of students at 8 historically Black colleges and universities in 7 states. Analyses showed major differences in the men's and women's responses. The men were significantly more likely than the women to be current smokers. Also, they more frequently reported heavy drinking, drinking and driving in the past days 30 days, and carrying a weapon. The women were significantly more likely to view themselves as overweight, and more than one third reported they were trying to lose weight. More than one third of the students had not exercised or participated in sports activities for more than 20 minutes in the past 7 days. Because historically Black colleges and universities educate the majority of undergraduate Black college students, multidimensional programs to promote disease prevention and health promotion for Black college students must be expanded and evaluated. SN - 0744-8481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9394088/Health_behaviors_of_students_attending_historically_black_colleges_and_universities:_results_from_the_National_College_Health_Risk_Behavior_Survey_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448489709595596 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -