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Dietary fat intake and risk of prostate cancer: a prospective study of 25,708 Norwegian men.
Int J Cancer 1997; 73(5):634-8IJ

Abstract

The relationship between incidence of prostate cancer and intake of dietary fat and foods rich in fat was studied in 25,708 men aged 16-56 years attending a Norwegian health screening in 1977-1983. Linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway ensured a complete follow-up until December 31, 1992. Diet was recorded on a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at the time of screening, and 72 cases of prostate cancer were identified during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, mean age of the total study sample was 56 years (range 19-68), while mean age at diagnosis of prostate cancer was 60 years (range 47-67). No association was found between energy-adjusted intake of total fat, saturated fat, mono-unsaturated fat or poly-unsaturated fat and the incidence of prostate cancer. Significant positive associations were found for body mass index (BMI) and consumption of hamburgers/meatballs, while no association was found with consumption of frankfurters/sausages and a significant negative association with the weekly number of main meals with meat. A significantly increased risk of prostate cancer was associated with skim milk as compared to whole milk. Milk preference (skim vs. whole) was associated significantly positively with BMI. Our study of a relatively young cohort does not confirm previous case-control and cohort studies suggesting that dietary fat, especially from animal sources, is associated positively with risk of prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, Norway. marit.veierod@basalmed.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9398038

Citation

Veierød, M B., et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: a Prospective Study of 25,708 Norwegian Men." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 73, no. 5, 1997, pp. 634-8.
Veierød MB, Laake P, Thelle DS. Dietary fat intake and risk of prostate cancer: a prospective study of 25,708 Norwegian men. Int J Cancer. 1997;73(5):634-8.
Veierød, M. B., Laake, P., & Thelle, D. S. (1997). Dietary fat intake and risk of prostate cancer: a prospective study of 25,708 Norwegian men. International Journal of Cancer, 73(5), pp. 634-8.
Veierød MB, Laake P, Thelle DS. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: a Prospective Study of 25,708 Norwegian Men. Int J Cancer. 1997 Nov 27;73(5):634-8. PubMed PMID: 9398038.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat intake and risk of prostate cancer: a prospective study of 25,708 Norwegian men. AU - Veierød,M B, AU - Laake,P, AU - Thelle,D S, PY - 1997/12/16/pubmed PY - 2000/6/20/medline PY - 1997/12/16/entrez SP - 634 EP - 8 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 73 IS - 5 N2 - The relationship between incidence of prostate cancer and intake of dietary fat and foods rich in fat was studied in 25,708 men aged 16-56 years attending a Norwegian health screening in 1977-1983. Linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway ensured a complete follow-up until December 31, 1992. Diet was recorded on a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at the time of screening, and 72 cases of prostate cancer were identified during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, mean age of the total study sample was 56 years (range 19-68), while mean age at diagnosis of prostate cancer was 60 years (range 47-67). No association was found between energy-adjusted intake of total fat, saturated fat, mono-unsaturated fat or poly-unsaturated fat and the incidence of prostate cancer. Significant positive associations were found for body mass index (BMI) and consumption of hamburgers/meatballs, while no association was found with consumption of frankfurters/sausages and a significant negative association with the weekly number of main meals with meat. A significantly increased risk of prostate cancer was associated with skim milk as compared to whole milk. Milk preference (skim vs. whole) was associated significantly positively with BMI. Our study of a relatively young cohort does not confirm previous case-control and cohort studies suggesting that dietary fat, especially from animal sources, is associated positively with risk of prostate cancer. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9398038/Dietary_fat_intake_and_risk_of_prostate_cancer:_a_prospective_study_of_25708_Norwegian_men_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0020-7136&date=1997&volume=73&issue=5&spage=634 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -