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Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urine samples by nucleic acid tests: comparison with culture and enzyme immunoassay of genital swab specimens.
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Dec; 35(12):3355-7.JC

Abstract

Two commercially available nucleic acid-based tests, ligase chain reaction (LCR; Abbott Laboratories) and PCR (Roche Diagnostics), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in male and female urine samples were compared with culture and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Microtrak; Syva) for C. trachomatis detection in genital samples. The samples were collected from 1,005 patients who attended a sexually transmitted disease clinic. In this study population, the prevalence of the infection was 4%. Specimens which were reactive in any of the tests were retested with a different PCR test using primers directed against the major outer membrane protein gene. With a "gold standard" of a positive culture, or any other positive test result if it was confirmed by an independent test, the Roche PCR (95% sensitive, 99.9% specific) was more sensitive than the LCR (75% sensitive, 100% specific) (chi2, P < 0.0001) while both tests were more sensitive than culture (58% sensitive, 100% specific) or EIA (45% sensitive, 100% specific) (chi2, P < 0.001). The Roche PCR and Abbott LCR tests of urine identified 65% and 30% more positive patients, respectively, than did testing by culture of urethral or cervical specimens. Nucleic acid testing of urine specimens for C. trachomatis is a more sensitive and convenient method for the detection of genital infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9399559

Citation

Schepetiuk, S, et al. "Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis in Urine Samples By Nucleic Acid Tests: Comparison With Culture and Enzyme Immunoassay of Genital Swab Specimens." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 35, no. 12, 1997, pp. 3355-7.
Schepetiuk S, Kok T, Martin L, et al. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urine samples by nucleic acid tests: comparison with culture and enzyme immunoassay of genital swab specimens. J Clin Microbiol. 1997;35(12):3355-7.
Schepetiuk, S., Kok, T., Martin, L., Waddell, R., & Higgins, G. (1997). Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urine samples by nucleic acid tests: comparison with culture and enzyme immunoassay of genital swab specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 35(12), 3355-7.
Schepetiuk S, et al. Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis in Urine Samples By Nucleic Acid Tests: Comparison With Culture and Enzyme Immunoassay of Genital Swab Specimens. J Clin Microbiol. 1997;35(12):3355-7. PubMed PMID: 9399559.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urine samples by nucleic acid tests: comparison with culture and enzyme immunoassay of genital swab specimens. AU - Schepetiuk,S, AU - Kok,T, AU - Martin,L, AU - Waddell,R, AU - Higgins,G, PY - 1997/12/17/pubmed PY - 1997/12/17/medline PY - 1997/12/17/entrez SP - 3355 EP - 7 JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J. Clin. Microbiol. VL - 35 IS - 12 N2 - Two commercially available nucleic acid-based tests, ligase chain reaction (LCR; Abbott Laboratories) and PCR (Roche Diagnostics), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in male and female urine samples were compared with culture and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Microtrak; Syva) for C. trachomatis detection in genital samples. The samples were collected from 1,005 patients who attended a sexually transmitted disease clinic. In this study population, the prevalence of the infection was 4%. Specimens which were reactive in any of the tests were retested with a different PCR test using primers directed against the major outer membrane protein gene. With a "gold standard" of a positive culture, or any other positive test result if it was confirmed by an independent test, the Roche PCR (95% sensitive, 99.9% specific) was more sensitive than the LCR (75% sensitive, 100% specific) (chi2, P < 0.0001) while both tests were more sensitive than culture (58% sensitive, 100% specific) or EIA (45% sensitive, 100% specific) (chi2, P < 0.001). The Roche PCR and Abbott LCR tests of urine identified 65% and 30% more positive patients, respectively, than did testing by culture of urethral or cervical specimens. Nucleic acid testing of urine specimens for C. trachomatis is a more sensitive and convenient method for the detection of genital infection. SN - 0095-1137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9399559/Detection_of_Chlamydia_trachomatis_in_urine_samples_by_nucleic_acid_tests:_comparison_with_culture_and_enzyme_immunoassay_of_genital_swab_specimens_ L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=9399559 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -