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Cerebral cortex pathology in aging and Alzheimer's disease: a quantitative survey of large hospital-based geriatric and psychiatric cohorts.
Brain Res Brain Res Rev 1997; 25(2):217-45BR

Abstract

In order to explore the relationships between the involvement of specific neuronal populations and cognitive deterioration, and to compare the hierarchical patterns of cortical involvement in normal brain aging and Alzheimer's disease, over 1200 brains from elderly subjects without cognitive deficits, as well as from patients with age-associated memory impairment and Alzheimer's disease, were examined. Our results suggest that the neuropathological changes associated with normal brain aging and Alzheimer's disease affect select cortical circuits at different points in time. Extensive hippocampal alterations are correlated with age-associated memory impairment, whereas substantial neurofibrillary tangle formation in neocortical association areas of the temporal lobe is a prerequisite for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Despite several lines of evidence involving amyloid deposit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, our observations indicate that there is no correlation between senile plaque densities and degree of dementia in both disorders. In contrast to younger elderly cases, in the ninth and tenth decades of life, there is a differential cortical involvement in that parietal and cingulate areas are early affected in the course of Alzheimer's disease, and neocortical senile plaques densities are strongly correlated with the severity of dementia. Moreover, Alzheimer's disease symptomatology is characterized in these very old patients by high neurofibrillary tangle densities in the anterior CA1 field, but not in the entorhinal cortex and inferior temporal cortex. These observations are discussed in the light of the hypothesis of global corticocortical disconnection and with respect to the notion of selective neuronal vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, HUG Belle-Idée, University of Geneva School of Medicine, Switzerland. giannako@cmu.unige.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9403139

Citation

Giannakopoulos, P, et al. "Cerebral Cortex Pathology in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: a Quantitative Survey of Large Hospital-based Geriatric and Psychiatric Cohorts." Brain Research. Brain Research Reviews, vol. 25, no. 2, 1997, pp. 217-45.
Giannakopoulos P, Hof PR, Michel JP, et al. Cerebral cortex pathology in aging and Alzheimer's disease: a quantitative survey of large hospital-based geriatric and psychiatric cohorts. Brain Res Brain Res Rev. 1997;25(2):217-45.
Giannakopoulos, P., Hof, P. R., Michel, J. P., Guimon, J., & Bouras, C. (1997). Cerebral cortex pathology in aging and Alzheimer's disease: a quantitative survey of large hospital-based geriatric and psychiatric cohorts. Brain Research. Brain Research Reviews, 25(2), pp. 217-45.
Giannakopoulos P, et al. Cerebral Cortex Pathology in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: a Quantitative Survey of Large Hospital-based Geriatric and Psychiatric Cohorts. Brain Res Brain Res Rev. 1997;25(2):217-45. PubMed PMID: 9403139.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cerebral cortex pathology in aging and Alzheimer's disease: a quantitative survey of large hospital-based geriatric and psychiatric cohorts. AU - Giannakopoulos,P, AU - Hof,P R, AU - Michel,J P, AU - Guimon,J, AU - Bouras,C, PY - 1997/12/24/pubmed PY - 1997/12/24/medline PY - 1997/12/24/entrez SP - 217 EP - 45 JF - Brain research. Brain research reviews JO - Brain Res. Brain Res. Rev. VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - In order to explore the relationships between the involvement of specific neuronal populations and cognitive deterioration, and to compare the hierarchical patterns of cortical involvement in normal brain aging and Alzheimer's disease, over 1200 brains from elderly subjects without cognitive deficits, as well as from patients with age-associated memory impairment and Alzheimer's disease, were examined. Our results suggest that the neuropathological changes associated with normal brain aging and Alzheimer's disease affect select cortical circuits at different points in time. Extensive hippocampal alterations are correlated with age-associated memory impairment, whereas substantial neurofibrillary tangle formation in neocortical association areas of the temporal lobe is a prerequisite for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Despite several lines of evidence involving amyloid deposit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, our observations indicate that there is no correlation between senile plaque densities and degree of dementia in both disorders. In contrast to younger elderly cases, in the ninth and tenth decades of life, there is a differential cortical involvement in that parietal and cingulate areas are early affected in the course of Alzheimer's disease, and neocortical senile plaques densities are strongly correlated with the severity of dementia. Moreover, Alzheimer's disease symptomatology is characterized in these very old patients by high neurofibrillary tangle densities in the anterior CA1 field, but not in the entorhinal cortex and inferior temporal cortex. These observations are discussed in the light of the hypothesis of global corticocortical disconnection and with respect to the notion of selective neuronal vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9403139/Cerebral_cortex_pathology_in_aging_and_Alzheimer's_disease:_a_quantitative_survey_of_large_hospital_based_geriatric_and_psychiatric_cohorts_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165017397000234 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -