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Do oats belong in a gluten-free diet?

Abstract

Celiac disease is an intolerance to protein fractions in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. When these grains are consumed by a person with celiac disease, they damage the mucosa of the small intestine, which eventually leads to malabsorption of nutrients. Patients are therefore advised to remove these grains from their diet, with lifelong adherence generally suggested. Although many dietitians and physicians consider this dietary prescription to be standard protocol, it is actually quite controversial. Whether oats can safely be consumed by persons with celiac disease has been debated since the gluten-free diet was first advocated more than 40 years ago. Historically, there have been several reasons for this debate, including the difficulty in identifying the precise amino acid sequence in gliadin that is responsible for toxicity; the differences in cereal chemistry between wheat and oats; and the lack of well-designed studies to assess the toxicity of oats. A growing body of evidence now suggests that moderate amounts of oats may be safely consumed by most adults with celiac disease. If further research continues to find no adverse effects from oat consumption, a consensus may emerge on the place of oats in the gluten-free diet. In the meantime, individual dietary prescriptions, routinely assessed for appropriateness using histologic and/or serologic studies, may be warranted to prevent unnecessary dietary restrictiveness and undesirable medical complications.

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    MeSH

    Adult
    Avena
    Celiac Disease
    Diet, Protein-Restricted
    Glutens
    Humans
    Phytotherapy
    Prescriptions
    Safety
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9404339

    Citation

    Thompson, T. "Do Oats Belong in a Gluten-free Diet?" Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 97, no. 12, 1997, pp. 1413-6.
    Thompson T. Do oats belong in a gluten-free diet? J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97(12):1413-6.
    Thompson, T. (1997). Do oats belong in a gluten-free diet? Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 97(12), pp. 1413-6.
    Thompson T. Do Oats Belong in a Gluten-free Diet. J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97(12):1413-6. PubMed PMID: 9404339.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Do oats belong in a gluten-free diet? A1 - Thompson,T, PY - 1997/12/24/pubmed PY - 1997/12/24/medline PY - 1997/12/24/entrez SP - 1413 EP - 6 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 97 IS - 12 N2 - Celiac disease is an intolerance to protein fractions in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. When these grains are consumed by a person with celiac disease, they damage the mucosa of the small intestine, which eventually leads to malabsorption of nutrients. Patients are therefore advised to remove these grains from their diet, with lifelong adherence generally suggested. Although many dietitians and physicians consider this dietary prescription to be standard protocol, it is actually quite controversial. Whether oats can safely be consumed by persons with celiac disease has been debated since the gluten-free diet was first advocated more than 40 years ago. Historically, there have been several reasons for this debate, including the difficulty in identifying the precise amino acid sequence in gliadin that is responsible for toxicity; the differences in cereal chemistry between wheat and oats; and the lack of well-designed studies to assess the toxicity of oats. A growing body of evidence now suggests that moderate amounts of oats may be safely consumed by most adults with celiac disease. If further research continues to find no adverse effects from oat consumption, a consensus may emerge on the place of oats in the gluten-free diet. In the meantime, individual dietary prescriptions, routinely assessed for appropriateness using histologic and/or serologic studies, may be warranted to prevent unnecessary dietary restrictiveness and undesirable medical complications. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9404339/Do_oats_belong_in_a_gluten_free_diet L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(97)00341-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -