Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Airborne dust and aeroallergen concentrations in different sources of feed and bedding for horses.
Vet Q. 1997 Nov; 19(4):154-8.VQ

Abstract

Standardized methods were used to make quantitative and qualitative assessments of respirable dust and aeroallergens in feed and bedding for horses. Concentrations of airborne dust were measured by using a Rion particle counter, and levels of major aeroallergens implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were measured by using an Andersen sampler. Laboratory conditions allowed comparison of the different sources of forage, supplements, and bedding without external influences such as ventilation, external temperature and horse activity affecting the result. Grass silages of approximately 50% dry matter and alfalfa pellets appeared to be very good sources of forage with low levels of dust and aeroallergens. The studied good quality straw was significantly less dusty with fewer allergens than the wood shavings. Supplements, such as whole grains and molassed concentrates, contained many respirable particles and aeroallergens. Rolled grains were significantly more dusty than good hay.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory for Functional Investigation, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liege, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9413111

Citation

Vandenput, S, et al. "Airborne Dust and Aeroallergen Concentrations in Different Sources of Feed and Bedding for Horses." The Veterinary Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 4, 1997, pp. 154-8.
Vandenput S, Istasse L, Nicks B, et al. Airborne dust and aeroallergen concentrations in different sources of feed and bedding for horses. Vet Q. 1997;19(4):154-8.
Vandenput, S., Istasse, L., Nicks, B., & Lekeux, P. (1997). Airborne dust and aeroallergen concentrations in different sources of feed and bedding for horses. The Veterinary Quarterly, 19(4), 154-8.
Vandenput S, et al. Airborne Dust and Aeroallergen Concentrations in Different Sources of Feed and Bedding for Horses. Vet Q. 1997;19(4):154-8. PubMed PMID: 9413111.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Airborne dust and aeroallergen concentrations in different sources of feed and bedding for horses. AU - Vandenput,S, AU - Istasse,L, AU - Nicks,B, AU - Lekeux,P, PY - 1997/12/31/pubmed PY - 1997/12/31/medline PY - 1997/12/31/entrez SP - 154 EP - 8 JF - The veterinary quarterly JO - Vet Q VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - Standardized methods were used to make quantitative and qualitative assessments of respirable dust and aeroallergens in feed and bedding for horses. Concentrations of airborne dust were measured by using a Rion particle counter, and levels of major aeroallergens implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were measured by using an Andersen sampler. Laboratory conditions allowed comparison of the different sources of forage, supplements, and bedding without external influences such as ventilation, external temperature and horse activity affecting the result. Grass silages of approximately 50% dry matter and alfalfa pellets appeared to be very good sources of forage with low levels of dust and aeroallergens. The studied good quality straw was significantly less dusty with fewer allergens than the wood shavings. Supplements, such as whole grains and molassed concentrates, contained many respirable particles and aeroallergens. Rolled grains were significantly more dusty than good hay. SN - 0165-2176 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9413111/Airborne_dust_and_aeroallergen_concentrations_in_different_sources_of_feed_and_bedding_for_horses_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01652176.1997.9694762 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -