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[Contraceptive agents and risk of thrombosis].
Praxis (Bern 1994). 1997 Oct 01; 86(40):1543-8.P

Abstract

In the late sixties and seventies, publications of the Royal College of General Practitioners in England reported that in women using oral contraceptiva the incidence of venous thromboembolism is increased by two to four fold. Moreover, it was demonstrated, that these alterations in coagulation were induced by ethinylestradiol in a dose dependent manner. Following these findings, its dosage was lowered from more than 100 micrograms to 20-30 micrograms per day. More recently, the role of gestagens in inducing thrombosis has also been debated. Different authors observed an increased risk for venous thromboembolism in women using third generation pills containing gestoden or desogestrel compared with users of second generation levonorgestrel contraceptiva. These reports have generated a lot of concern and fear in the patients as well as doctors and have led to a drastic fall in the use of oral contraceptives. Due to the unavailability of safe contraceptive alternatives, the number of women experiencing unwanted pregnancy and its complications increased significantly. Indeed, direct proof for the role of gestagens in inducing thromboembolism is still lacking as the protocol designs of these studies do not allow us to infer whether the effects are due to the gestagens or to confounding variables. Hence, the discussions were beneficial for clinicians to remember the importance of checking the patient for individual and family risks for thrombosis before handling out a pill prescription.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departement Frauenheilkunde, Universitätsspital Zürich.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

ger

PubMed ID

9417570

Citation

Maurer-Major, E, and P J. Keller. "[Contraceptive Agents and Risk of Thrombosis]." Praxis, vol. 86, no. 40, 1997, pp. 1543-8.
Maurer-Major E, Keller PJ. [Contraceptive agents and risk of thrombosis]. Praxis (Bern 1994). 1997;86(40):1543-8.
Maurer-Major, E., & Keller, P. J. (1997). [Contraceptive agents and risk of thrombosis]. Praxis, 86(40), 1543-8.
Maurer-Major E, Keller PJ. [Contraceptive Agents and Risk of Thrombosis]. Praxis (Bern 1994). 1997 Oct 1;86(40):1543-8. PubMed PMID: 9417570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Contraceptive agents and risk of thrombosis]. AU - Maurer-Major,E, AU - Keller,P J, PY - 1998/1/7/pubmed PY - 1998/1/7/medline PY - 1998/1/7/entrez KW - Biology KW - Blood Coagulation Effects KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Agents KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female KW - Contraceptive Agents, Progestin KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Critique KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - Embolism KW - Endocrine System KW - Estrogens KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Hematological Effects KW - Hemic System KW - Hormones KW - Literature Review KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Oral Contraceptives, Low-dose KW - Physiology KW - Progestational Hormones KW - Risk Factors KW - Switzerland KW - Thromboembolism KW - Vascular Diseases KW - Western Europe SP - 1543 EP - 8 JF - Praxis JO - Praxis (Bern 1994) VL - 86 IS - 40 N2 - In the late sixties and seventies, publications of the Royal College of General Practitioners in England reported that in women using oral contraceptiva the incidence of venous thromboembolism is increased by two to four fold. Moreover, it was demonstrated, that these alterations in coagulation were induced by ethinylestradiol in a dose dependent manner. Following these findings, its dosage was lowered from more than 100 micrograms to 20-30 micrograms per day. More recently, the role of gestagens in inducing thrombosis has also been debated. Different authors observed an increased risk for venous thromboembolism in women using third generation pills containing gestoden or desogestrel compared with users of second generation levonorgestrel contraceptiva. These reports have generated a lot of concern and fear in the patients as well as doctors and have led to a drastic fall in the use of oral contraceptives. Due to the unavailability of safe contraceptive alternatives, the number of women experiencing unwanted pregnancy and its complications increased significantly. Indeed, direct proof for the role of gestagens in inducing thromboembolism is still lacking as the protocol designs of these studies do not allow us to infer whether the effects are due to the gestagens or to confounding variables. Hence, the discussions were beneficial for clinicians to remember the importance of checking the patient for individual and family risks for thrombosis before handling out a pill prescription. SN - 1661-8157 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9417570/[Contraceptive_agents_and_risk_of_thrombosis]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7087 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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