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Autonomic components of the cardiovascular responses to an acoustic startle stimulus in rats.
J Auton Pharmacol. 1997 Oct; 17(5):303-9.JA

Abstract

1. A loud acoustic stimulus was administered to rats prior to and after treatment with autonomic blockers in order to unravel the autonomic mechanisms of the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to startle. 2. Six rats, implanted with a BP telemetric system, were used in a randomized crossover saline-controlled (saline vs. autonomic blocker) study with a washout period of 7 days between each active session. A first acoustic stimulus (110 dB, 0.7 s) was administered. An autonomic blocker i.e. atropine methylnitrate (15 mg. kg-1), atenolol (15 mg. kg-1) or prazosin HCl (1 mg. kg-1), or physiological saline was administered i.p. 40 min prior to a second identical acoustic stimulus. 3. The average BP rise following the first stimulus was +25 mmHg and the average HR change was +17 bpm. The responses after autonomic blockades were affected as follows: atropine increased the HR rise (+45.1 +/- 1.7 bpm), atenolol reversed the HR changes to a bradycardic response (-21.4 +/- 9.1 bpm), after prazosin treatment the BP rise was reversed into a BP decrease (-11.3 +/- 3.2 mmHg) and the HR increase was amplified (+76.0 +/- 10.0 bpm). Finally, the delay for obtaining the maximal BP change was increased from 1.9 to 2.6 s following prazosin pretreatment. 4. These results indicate that the BP rise resulting from an acute loud noise depends on a vascular sympathetic activation (prevented with prazosin), which is partly blunted by vasodilation (revealed with prazosin). The evoked HR changes combine a sympathetic activation (fully expressed following atropine) and a vagal activation (unmasked with atenolol). Further experiments are necessary to document the vasodilatory component unmasked with prazosin.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, CNRS URA1482, Fac. Medicine Necker, Paris, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9427109

Citation

Baudrie, V, et al. "Autonomic Components of the Cardiovascular Responses to an Acoustic Startle Stimulus in Rats." Journal of Autonomic Pharmacology, vol. 17, no. 5, 1997, pp. 303-9.
Baudrie V, Tulen JH, Blanc J, et al. Autonomic components of the cardiovascular responses to an acoustic startle stimulus in rats. J Auton Pharmacol. 1997;17(5):303-9.
Baudrie, V., Tulen, J. H., Blanc, J., & Elghozi, J. L. (1997). Autonomic components of the cardiovascular responses to an acoustic startle stimulus in rats. Journal of Autonomic Pharmacology, 17(5), 303-9.
Baudrie V, et al. Autonomic Components of the Cardiovascular Responses to an Acoustic Startle Stimulus in Rats. J Auton Pharmacol. 1997;17(5):303-9. PubMed PMID: 9427109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Autonomic components of the cardiovascular responses to an acoustic startle stimulus in rats. AU - Baudrie,V, AU - Tulen,J H, AU - Blanc,J, AU - Elghozi,J L, PY - 1998/1/14/pubmed PY - 1998/1/14/medline PY - 1998/1/14/entrez SP - 303 EP - 9 JF - Journal of autonomic pharmacology JO - J Auton Pharmacol VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - 1. A loud acoustic stimulus was administered to rats prior to and after treatment with autonomic blockers in order to unravel the autonomic mechanisms of the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to startle. 2. Six rats, implanted with a BP telemetric system, were used in a randomized crossover saline-controlled (saline vs. autonomic blocker) study with a washout period of 7 days between each active session. A first acoustic stimulus (110 dB, 0.7 s) was administered. An autonomic blocker i.e. atropine methylnitrate (15 mg. kg-1), atenolol (15 mg. kg-1) or prazosin HCl (1 mg. kg-1), or physiological saline was administered i.p. 40 min prior to a second identical acoustic stimulus. 3. The average BP rise following the first stimulus was +25 mmHg and the average HR change was +17 bpm. The responses after autonomic blockades were affected as follows: atropine increased the HR rise (+45.1 +/- 1.7 bpm), atenolol reversed the HR changes to a bradycardic response (-21.4 +/- 9.1 bpm), after prazosin treatment the BP rise was reversed into a BP decrease (-11.3 +/- 3.2 mmHg) and the HR increase was amplified (+76.0 +/- 10.0 bpm). Finally, the delay for obtaining the maximal BP change was increased from 1.9 to 2.6 s following prazosin pretreatment. 4. These results indicate that the BP rise resulting from an acute loud noise depends on a vascular sympathetic activation (prevented with prazosin), which is partly blunted by vasodilation (revealed with prazosin). The evoked HR changes combine a sympathetic activation (fully expressed following atropine) and a vagal activation (unmasked with atenolol). Further experiments are necessary to document the vasodilatory component unmasked with prazosin. SN - 0144-1795 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9427109/Autonomic_components_of_the_cardiovascular_responses_to_an_acoustic_startle_stimulus_in_rats_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0144-1795&date=1997&volume=17&issue=5&spage=303 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -