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Microalbuminuria is positively associated with usual dietary saturated fat intake and negatively associated with usual dietary protein intake in people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Jan; 67(1):50-7.AJ

Abstract

Microalbuminuria has a cumulative incidence of > 30% in persons by 25 y duration of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and is a strong predictor of renal disease and mortality. Although improved glycemic control, maintenance of normal blood pressure, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are important strategies to avoid developing microalbuminuria, dietary macronutrient intake may also play a role. A cross-sectional population-based study of Tasmanian adults with IDDM and no previous diagnosis of microalbuminuria was conducted by measuring usual dietary macronutrient intake with a food-frequency questionnaire and defining microalbuminuria as an average urinary albumin excretion rate between 20 and 200 micrograms albumin/min in at least two of three timed overnight urine collections. After sex, age, duration of diabetes, daily number of insulin injections, body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, serum high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, frequency of exercise, and smoking status were adjusted for, the adjusted odds ratio for microalbuminuria for the highest quintile of energy-adjusted usual saturated fat intake compared with the lowest quintile was 4.9 (95% CI: 1.2, 20.0; P = 0.03). The adjusted odds ratio for microalbuminuria for the highest quintile of energy-adjusted usual protein intake compared with the lowest quintile was 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.56; P = 0.01). There was no significant association between microalbuminuria and energy-adjusted carbohydrate intake, energy-adjusted monounsaturated fat intake, or energy-adjusted polyunsaturated fat intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Menzies Centre for Population Health Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. mdr@utas.edu.auNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9440375

Citation

Riley, M D., and T Dwyer. "Microalbuminuria Is Positively Associated With Usual Dietary Saturated Fat Intake and Negatively Associated With Usual Dietary Protein Intake in People With Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 67, no. 1, 1998, pp. 50-7.
Riley MD, Dwyer T. Microalbuminuria is positively associated with usual dietary saturated fat intake and negatively associated with usual dietary protein intake in people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;67(1):50-7.
Riley, M. D., & Dwyer, T. (1998). Microalbuminuria is positively associated with usual dietary saturated fat intake and negatively associated with usual dietary protein intake in people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 67(1), 50-7.
Riley MD, Dwyer T. Microalbuminuria Is Positively Associated With Usual Dietary Saturated Fat Intake and Negatively Associated With Usual Dietary Protein Intake in People With Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;67(1):50-7. PubMed PMID: 9440375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microalbuminuria is positively associated with usual dietary saturated fat intake and negatively associated with usual dietary protein intake in people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. AU - Riley,M D, AU - Dwyer,T, PY - 1998/1/24/pubmed PY - 1998/1/24/medline PY - 1998/1/24/entrez SP - 50 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 67 IS - 1 N2 - Microalbuminuria has a cumulative incidence of > 30% in persons by 25 y duration of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and is a strong predictor of renal disease and mortality. Although improved glycemic control, maintenance of normal blood pressure, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are important strategies to avoid developing microalbuminuria, dietary macronutrient intake may also play a role. A cross-sectional population-based study of Tasmanian adults with IDDM and no previous diagnosis of microalbuminuria was conducted by measuring usual dietary macronutrient intake with a food-frequency questionnaire and defining microalbuminuria as an average urinary albumin excretion rate between 20 and 200 micrograms albumin/min in at least two of three timed overnight urine collections. After sex, age, duration of diabetes, daily number of insulin injections, body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, serum high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, frequency of exercise, and smoking status were adjusted for, the adjusted odds ratio for microalbuminuria for the highest quintile of energy-adjusted usual saturated fat intake compared with the lowest quintile was 4.9 (95% CI: 1.2, 20.0; P = 0.03). The adjusted odds ratio for microalbuminuria for the highest quintile of energy-adjusted usual protein intake compared with the lowest quintile was 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.56; P = 0.01). There was no significant association between microalbuminuria and energy-adjusted carbohydrate intake, energy-adjusted monounsaturated fat intake, or energy-adjusted polyunsaturated fat intake. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9440375/Microalbuminuria_is_positively_associated_with_usual_dietary_saturated_fat_intake_and_negatively_associated_with_usual_dietary_protein_intake_in_people_with_insulin_dependent_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/67.1.50 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -