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[The correlation between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and social status in a population of 2235 Danes].
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jan 12; 160(3):277-82.UL

Abstract

The objective was to examine the relationships between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and sociodemographic factors (school education, occupational education, occupation, income, marital status, cohabituary status, housing, social class) in a survey performed in Copenhagen County during 1982-1984. The participants, selected at random, comprised 2235 Danish Caucasian individuals, all non-blood-donors (1044 men, 1191 non-pregnant women) in cohorts 30, 40, 50 and 60 years old. In all age groups, men had significantly higher serum ferritin and alcohol consumption than women. In men, there was no relationship between serum ferritin and social class. Significant relationships were observed between ferritin and occupation (unemployed and self-employed men had the highest ferritin and ferritin and income (ferritin increased with income). None of the social variables were associated with the prevalence of small or absent iron stores (serum ferritin < or = 30 micrograms/l) or abundant iron stores (serum ferritin > 300 micrograms/l). Alcohol consumption displayed relationships to occupation and become, but not to social class. In women, none of the social variables showed any relationship to ferritin levels or iron overload. The prevalence of small iron stores was lower and the make of alcohol was higher in women from high social classes. In both men and women, serum ferritin displayed significant positive correlations with alcohol consumption. Likewise, the prevalence of iron overload was closely correlated to alcohol consumption. In conclusion, sociodemographic factors per se had a minor influence on serum ferritin levels and iron status in Danes. The distinct association between alcohol consumption and serum ferritin should be considered in future epidemiological iron status surveys.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Amtssygehuset i Glostrup, Københavns Amts Center for Sygdomsforebyggelse.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

dan

PubMed ID

9454396

Citation

Milman, N, and M Kirchhoff. "[The Correlation Between Serum Ferritin, Alcohol Consumption and Social Status in a Population of 2235 Danes]." Ugeskrift for Laeger, vol. 160, no. 3, 1998, pp. 277-82.
Milman N, Kirchhoff M. [The correlation between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and social status in a population of 2235 Danes]. Ugeskr Laeger. 1998;160(3):277-82.
Milman, N., & Kirchhoff, M. (1998). [The correlation between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and social status in a population of 2235 Danes]. Ugeskrift for Laeger, 160(3), 277-82.
Milman N, Kirchhoff M. [The Correlation Between Serum Ferritin, Alcohol Consumption and Social Status in a Population of 2235 Danes]. Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jan 12;160(3):277-82. PubMed PMID: 9454396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [The correlation between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and social status in a population of 2235 Danes]. AU - Milman,N, AU - Kirchhoff,M, PY - 1998/2/7/pubmed PY - 1998/2/7/medline PY - 1998/2/7/entrez SP - 277 EP - 82 JF - Ugeskrift for laeger JO - Ugeskr Laeger VL - 160 IS - 3 N2 - The objective was to examine the relationships between serum ferritin, alcohol consumption and sociodemographic factors (school education, occupational education, occupation, income, marital status, cohabituary status, housing, social class) in a survey performed in Copenhagen County during 1982-1984. The participants, selected at random, comprised 2235 Danish Caucasian individuals, all non-blood-donors (1044 men, 1191 non-pregnant women) in cohorts 30, 40, 50 and 60 years old. In all age groups, men had significantly higher serum ferritin and alcohol consumption than women. In men, there was no relationship between serum ferritin and social class. Significant relationships were observed between ferritin and occupation (unemployed and self-employed men had the highest ferritin and ferritin and income (ferritin increased with income). None of the social variables were associated with the prevalence of small or absent iron stores (serum ferritin < or = 30 micrograms/l) or abundant iron stores (serum ferritin > 300 micrograms/l). Alcohol consumption displayed relationships to occupation and become, but not to social class. In women, none of the social variables showed any relationship to ferritin levels or iron overload. The prevalence of small iron stores was lower and the make of alcohol was higher in women from high social classes. In both men and women, serum ferritin displayed significant positive correlations with alcohol consumption. Likewise, the prevalence of iron overload was closely correlated to alcohol consumption. In conclusion, sociodemographic factors per se had a minor influence on serum ferritin levels and iron status in Danes. The distinct association between alcohol consumption and serum ferritin should be considered in future epidemiological iron status surveys. SN - 0041-5782 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9454396/[The_correlation_between_serum_ferritin_alcohol_consumption_and_social_status_in_a_population_of_2235_Danes]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alcohol.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -