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Head-shaking nystagmus: a sensitive indicator of vestibular dysfunction.
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1997 Dec; 22(6):549-52.CO

Abstract

This study investigated 258 consecutive patients with the complaint of vertigo undergoing vestibular function tests between August 1992 and July 1994. The head-shaking nystagmus test was performed in a passive fashion with the patient placed in a sitting position with the head anteflexed at 30 degrees and oscillated +/- 45 degrees horizontally for 30 cycles in 15 s; the post head-shaking nystagmus was recorded by electronystagmography. Conventional bithermal caloric tests were conducted with the normal limit of canal paresis set at 20%. The results show significant correlation between head-shaking nystagmus and canal paresis. Head-shaking nystagmus is more sensitive than canal paresis in predicting vestibular dysfunction. The sensitivity of head-shaking nystagmus in detecting a canal paresis was 90%. Although the direction of head-shaking nystagmus does not always accord with the side of peripheral vestibular dysfunction, it is an indicator of vestibular dysfunction and this test could be performed easily as a screening test in every otoneurological investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9466069

Citation

Tseng, H Z., and W Y. Chao. "Head-shaking Nystagmus: a Sensitive Indicator of Vestibular Dysfunction." Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences, vol. 22, no. 6, 1997, pp. 549-52.
Tseng HZ, Chao WY. Head-shaking nystagmus: a sensitive indicator of vestibular dysfunction. Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1997;22(6):549-52.
Tseng, H. Z., & Chao, W. Y. (1997). Head-shaking nystagmus: a sensitive indicator of vestibular dysfunction. Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences, 22(6), 549-52.
Tseng HZ, Chao WY. Head-shaking Nystagmus: a Sensitive Indicator of Vestibular Dysfunction. Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1997;22(6):549-52. PubMed PMID: 9466069.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Head-shaking nystagmus: a sensitive indicator of vestibular dysfunction. AU - Tseng,H Z, AU - Chao,W Y, PY - 1998/2/18/pubmed PY - 1998/2/18/medline PY - 1998/2/18/entrez SP - 549 EP - 52 JF - Clinical otolaryngology and allied sciences JO - Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - This study investigated 258 consecutive patients with the complaint of vertigo undergoing vestibular function tests between August 1992 and July 1994. The head-shaking nystagmus test was performed in a passive fashion with the patient placed in a sitting position with the head anteflexed at 30 degrees and oscillated +/- 45 degrees horizontally for 30 cycles in 15 s; the post head-shaking nystagmus was recorded by electronystagmography. Conventional bithermal caloric tests were conducted with the normal limit of canal paresis set at 20%. The results show significant correlation between head-shaking nystagmus and canal paresis. Head-shaking nystagmus is more sensitive than canal paresis in predicting vestibular dysfunction. The sensitivity of head-shaking nystagmus in detecting a canal paresis was 90%. Although the direction of head-shaking nystagmus does not always accord with the side of peripheral vestibular dysfunction, it is an indicator of vestibular dysfunction and this test could be performed easily as a screening test in every otoneurological investigation. SN - 0307-7772 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9466069/Head_shaking_nystagmus:_a_sensitive_indicator_of_vestibular_dysfunction_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0307-7772&date=1997&volume=22&issue=6&spage=549 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -