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Body fat distribution and race differences in apolipoprotein A1.
Ethn Dis. 1997 Autumn; 7(3):250-8.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This is the first study to assess the role of waist-to-hip ratio in explaining race differences in levels of serum apolipoprotein A1, a protective risk factor for atherosclerosis.

METHODS

Linear regression analyses were used in a community-based survey of 3,043 adults (23.5% African-American) to assess associations of race, age, anthropometric measures, education, diabetes, blood pressure medication use, cigarette smoking, and leisure-time physical activity with apolipoprotein A1 levels.

RESULTS

Higher apolipoprotein A1 levels were observed among African-American than among white adults (African-American men: +15.6 mg/dl than white men, African-American women: +3.1 mg/dl more than white women; p < 0.05). Waist-to-hip ratio and other variables did not account for race differences among men. African-American women had +8.6 mg/dl higher levels than white women after adjustment for differing distributions of waist-to-hip ratio, age, body mass index and education. Cigarette smoking, physical activity, and medical history accounted for no further differences among women.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher levels of obesity indicators and lower educational attainment among African-American women reduced a potentially greater beneficial race difference in apolipoprotein A1. These findings also suggest that other environmental and biochemical factors may play roles in explaining the higher protective levels of apolipoprotein A1 observed among African-American children and adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9467708

Citation

Ferguson, J E., et al. "Body Fat Distribution and Race Differences in Apolipoprotein A1." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 7, no. 3, 1997, pp. 250-8.
Ferguson JE, Croft JB, Thompson SJ, et al. Body fat distribution and race differences in apolipoprotein A1. Ethn Dis. 1997;7(3):250-8.
Ferguson, J. E., Croft, J. B., Thompson, S. J., Addy, C. L., Sheridan, D. P., Wheeler, F. C., & Macera, C. A. (1997). Body fat distribution and race differences in apolipoprotein A1. Ethnicity & Disease, 7(3), 250-8.
Ferguson JE, et al. Body Fat Distribution and Race Differences in Apolipoprotein A1. Ethn Dis. 1997;7(3):250-8. PubMed PMID: 9467708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body fat distribution and race differences in apolipoprotein A1. AU - Ferguson,J E, AU - Croft,J B, AU - Thompson,S J, AU - Addy,C L, AU - Sheridan,D P, AU - Wheeler,F C, AU - Macera,C A, PY - 1998/2/19/pubmed PY - 1998/2/19/medline PY - 1998/2/19/entrez SP - 250 EP - 8 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This is the first study to assess the role of waist-to-hip ratio in explaining race differences in levels of serum apolipoprotein A1, a protective risk factor for atherosclerosis. METHODS: Linear regression analyses were used in a community-based survey of 3,043 adults (23.5% African-American) to assess associations of race, age, anthropometric measures, education, diabetes, blood pressure medication use, cigarette smoking, and leisure-time physical activity with apolipoprotein A1 levels. RESULTS: Higher apolipoprotein A1 levels were observed among African-American than among white adults (African-American men: +15.6 mg/dl than white men, African-American women: +3.1 mg/dl more than white women; p < 0.05). Waist-to-hip ratio and other variables did not account for race differences among men. African-American women had +8.6 mg/dl higher levels than white women after adjustment for differing distributions of waist-to-hip ratio, age, body mass index and education. Cigarette smoking, physical activity, and medical history accounted for no further differences among women. CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of obesity indicators and lower educational attainment among African-American women reduced a potentially greater beneficial race difference in apolipoprotein A1. These findings also suggest that other environmental and biochemical factors may play roles in explaining the higher protective levels of apolipoprotein A1 observed among African-American children and adults. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9467708/Body_fat_distribution_and_race_differences_in_apolipoprotein_A1_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bodyweight.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -