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Fat oxidation in nonobese and obese adolescents: effect of body composition and pubertal development.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To measure postabsorptive fat oxidation (F(ox)) and to assess its association with body composition (lean body mass [LBM] and body fat mass [BFM]) and pubertal development.

DESIGN

We studied 235 control (male/female ratio = 116/119; age [mean +/- SD]: 13.1 +/- 1.7 years; weight: 45.3 +/- 10.5 kg; LBM: 34.3 +/- 7.1 kg; BFM: 11.0 +/- 4.5 kg) and 159 obese (male/female ratio = 93/66; age: 12.9 +/- 2.1 years; weight: 76.2 +/- 19.1 kg; LBM: 47.4 +/- 10.9 kg; BFM: 28.8 +/- 9.2 kg) adolescents. Postabsorptive F(ox) was calculated from oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and urinary nitrogen as measured by indirect calorimetry and Kjeldahl's method, respectively. Body composition was determined by anthropometry.

RESULTS

Postabsorptive F(ox) (absolute value and percentage of resting metabolic rate) was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the obese adolescents (76.7 +/- 26.3 gm/24 hours, 42.3% +/- 18.7%) than in the control subjects (40.0 +/- 26.3 gm/24 hours, 28.7% +/- 17.0%), even if adjusted for LBM. F(ox) corrected for BFM was similar in control and in obese children, but was significantly lower in girls compared with boys (control male subjects: 62.1 +/- 29.1 gm/24 hours, control female subjects: 51.6 +/- 28.4 gm/24 hours, obese male subjects: 57.3 +/- 29 gm/24 hour, obese female subjects: 45.0 +/- 28.4 gm/24 hours). BFM and LBM showed a significant positive correlation with F(ox). By stepwise regression analysis the most important determinant of F(ox) was BFM in obese and LBM in control children. There was a significant rise in F(ox) during puberty; however, it was mainly explained by changes in body composition.

CONCLUSIONS

Obese adolescents have higher F(ox) rates than their normal-weight counterparts. Both LBM and fat mass are important determinants of F(ox).

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, University Medical School of Pécs, Hungary.

    Source

    The Journal of pediatrics 132:1 1998 Jan pg 98-104

    MeSH

    Adipose Tissue
    Adolescent
    Analysis of Variance
    Body Composition
    Calorimetry, Indirect
    Carbon Dioxide
    Energy Metabolism
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Nitrogen
    Obesity
    Oxygen Consumption
    Puberty
    Regression Analysis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9470008

    Citation

    Molnár, D, and Y Schutz. "Fat Oxidation in Nonobese and Obese Adolescents: Effect of Body Composition and Pubertal Development." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 132, no. 1, 1998, pp. 98-104.
    Molnár D, Schutz Y. Fat oxidation in nonobese and obese adolescents: effect of body composition and pubertal development. J Pediatr. 1998;132(1):98-104.
    Molnár, D., & Schutz, Y. (1998). Fat oxidation in nonobese and obese adolescents: effect of body composition and pubertal development. The Journal of Pediatrics, 132(1), pp. 98-104.
    Molnár D, Schutz Y. Fat Oxidation in Nonobese and Obese Adolescents: Effect of Body Composition and Pubertal Development. J Pediatr. 1998;132(1):98-104. PubMed PMID: 9470008.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fat oxidation in nonobese and obese adolescents: effect of body composition and pubertal development. AU - Molnár,D, AU - Schutz,Y, PY - 1998/2/21/pubmed PY - 1998/2/21/medline PY - 1998/2/21/entrez SP - 98 EP - 104 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J. Pediatr. VL - 132 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To measure postabsorptive fat oxidation (F(ox)) and to assess its association with body composition (lean body mass [LBM] and body fat mass [BFM]) and pubertal development. DESIGN: We studied 235 control (male/female ratio = 116/119; age [mean +/- SD]: 13.1 +/- 1.7 years; weight: 45.3 +/- 10.5 kg; LBM: 34.3 +/- 7.1 kg; BFM: 11.0 +/- 4.5 kg) and 159 obese (male/female ratio = 93/66; age: 12.9 +/- 2.1 years; weight: 76.2 +/- 19.1 kg; LBM: 47.4 +/- 10.9 kg; BFM: 28.8 +/- 9.2 kg) adolescents. Postabsorptive F(ox) was calculated from oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and urinary nitrogen as measured by indirect calorimetry and Kjeldahl's method, respectively. Body composition was determined by anthropometry. RESULTS: Postabsorptive F(ox) (absolute value and percentage of resting metabolic rate) was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the obese adolescents (76.7 +/- 26.3 gm/24 hours, 42.3% +/- 18.7%) than in the control subjects (40.0 +/- 26.3 gm/24 hours, 28.7% +/- 17.0%), even if adjusted for LBM. F(ox) corrected for BFM was similar in control and in obese children, but was significantly lower in girls compared with boys (control male subjects: 62.1 +/- 29.1 gm/24 hours, control female subjects: 51.6 +/- 28.4 gm/24 hours, obese male subjects: 57.3 +/- 29 gm/24 hour, obese female subjects: 45.0 +/- 28.4 gm/24 hours). BFM and LBM showed a significant positive correlation with F(ox). By stepwise regression analysis the most important determinant of F(ox) was BFM in obese and LBM in control children. There was a significant rise in F(ox) during puberty; however, it was mainly explained by changes in body composition. CONCLUSIONS: Obese adolescents have higher F(ox) rates than their normal-weight counterparts. Both LBM and fat mass are important determinants of F(ox). SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9470008/Fat_oxidation_in_nonobese_and_obese_adolescents:_effect_of_body_composition_and_pubertal_development_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(98)70492-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -