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Treatment of vaginal infections: candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis.
J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 1997 Sep-Oct; NS37(5):563-9.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the signs and symptoms of and recommend treatments for Candida vulvovaginitis, bacterial vaginosis, and Trichomonas vaginitis.

DATA SOURCES

Current clinical literature.

DATA SYNTHESIS

Patients with candidal vulvovaginitis often present with itching, burning, white discharge, vulvar or vaginal erythema, painful intercourse, and stinging on urination. It is treated with oral or topical antifungal agents. Bacterial vaginosis is characterized by a musty or fishy vaginal odor and a thin, white vaginal discharge. It is treated with oral or topical metronidazole or clindamycin. Patients with trichomoniasis usually complain of profuse, yellow-green discharge and vaginal or vulvar irritation. The standard treatment is a single 2 gram dose of oral metronidazole for both the patient and sexual partners.

CONCLUSION

Given the potential adverse effects of the drugs used to treat these conditions, pharmacists are in a unique position to recommend appropriate therapies and to refer patients to other health care providers as needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Defense Pharmacoeconomic Center, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin 78234-6190, USA. Andrea_Ries@smtplink.hcssa.amedd.army.mil

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9479409

Citation

Ries, A J.. "Treatment of Vaginal Infections: Candidiasis, Bacterial Vaginosis, and Trichomoniasis." Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association (Washington,D.C. : 1996), vol. NS37, no. 5, 1997, pp. 563-9.
Ries AJ. Treatment of vaginal infections: candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 1997;NS37(5):563-9.
Ries, A. J. (1997). Treatment of vaginal infections: candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association (Washington,D.C. : 1996), NS37(5), 563-9.
Ries AJ. Treatment of Vaginal Infections: Candidiasis, Bacterial Vaginosis, and Trichomoniasis. J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 1997 Sep-Oct;NS37(5):563-9. PubMed PMID: 9479409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of vaginal infections: candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. A1 - Ries,A J, PY - 1998/2/28/pubmed PY - 1998/2/28/medline PY - 1998/2/28/entrez SP - 563 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association (Washington,D.C. : 1996) JO - J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash) VL - NS37 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the signs and symptoms of and recommend treatments for Candida vulvovaginitis, bacterial vaginosis, and Trichomonas vaginitis. DATA SOURCES: Current clinical literature. DATA SYNTHESIS: Patients with candidal vulvovaginitis often present with itching, burning, white discharge, vulvar or vaginal erythema, painful intercourse, and stinging on urination. It is treated with oral or topical antifungal agents. Bacterial vaginosis is characterized by a musty or fishy vaginal odor and a thin, white vaginal discharge. It is treated with oral or topical metronidazole or clindamycin. Patients with trichomoniasis usually complain of profuse, yellow-green discharge and vaginal or vulvar irritation. The standard treatment is a single 2 gram dose of oral metronidazole for both the patient and sexual partners. CONCLUSION: Given the potential adverse effects of the drugs used to treat these conditions, pharmacists are in a unique position to recommend appropriate therapies and to refer patients to other health care providers as needed. SN - 1086-5802 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9479409/Treatment_of_vaginal_infections:_candidiasis_bacterial_vaginosis_and_trichomoniasis_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/trichomoniasis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -