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How different constituents of human plasma and low density lipoprotein determine plasma oxidizability by copper.

Abstract

Lipoprotein oxidation induced in vitro in whole plasma is expected to represent a more relevant model of the lipoprotein oxidation in the arterial wall than the in vitro oxidation of single isolated lipoproteins, e.g. low density lipoprotein (LDL). However, it remains unclear, how lipoprotein oxidation occurring in plasma is related to chemical composition and properties of the latter as well as to those of individual plasma lipoproteins. The present study was undertaken to characterize, how different constituents of human plasma contribute to the oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins oxidized directly in plasma samples. Oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins was assessed as oxidizability of whole heparin plasma and was measured spectrophotometrically as an increase in absorbance at 234 nm. To relate plasma oxidizability to its chemical composition and properties, plasma hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants, fatty acids, total lipids and TRAP were measured. To relate plasma oxidizability to the properties of individual lipoproteins, chemical composition and oxidizability were evaluated for LDL. We found that the oxidation kinetics of heparin plasma (diluted 150-fold and oxidized by 50 microM Cu2+) was characterized by three consecutive phases similar to the lag-, propagation and decomposition phases of LDL oxidation. Plasma oxidizability measured as different characteristics of these phases correlated negatively with plasma initial SH-groups, albumin, ascorbate, bilirubin, alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, free cholesterol, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid content and positively with plasma initial total cholesterol, cholesterol ester and polyunsaturated fatty acid content. Plasma oxidizability measured as a rate of conjugated diene accumulation after different periods of oxidation correlated negatively with plasma initial albumin, urate, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene content. A positive correlation between oxidizabilities of whole plasma and LDL (isolated from the same plasma samples and oxidized by 14 mol Cu2+/mol LDL) was found. These data show that the oxidizability of plasma samples is critically determined by their chemical composition. They also suggest that the plasma oxidizability measured as an increase in absorbance at 234 nm may be used as a practical measure of the oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Universitätskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Medizinische Kern und Poliklinik, Biochemisches Labor, Hamburg, Germany.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Chemistry and physics of lipids 91:1 1998 Jan pg 39-52

    MeSH

    Antioxidants
    Cholesterol
    Copper
    Fatty Acids
    Humans
    Kinetics
    Lipid Peroxidation
    Lipids
    Lipoproteins, LDL
    Oxidation-Reduction
    Plasma
    Spectrophotometry

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9488998

    Citation

    Spranger, T, et al. "How Different Constituents of Human Plasma and Low Density Lipoprotein Determine Plasma Oxidizability By Copper." Chemistry and Physics of Lipids, vol. 91, no. 1, 1998, pp. 39-52.
    Spranger T, Finckh B, Fingerhut R, et al. How different constituents of human plasma and low density lipoprotein determine plasma oxidizability by copper. Chem Phys Lipids. 1998;91(1):39-52.
    Spranger, T., Finckh, B., Fingerhut, R., Kohlschütter, A., Beisiegel, U., & Kontush, A. (1998). How different constituents of human plasma and low density lipoprotein determine plasma oxidizability by copper. Chemistry and Physics of Lipids, 91(1), pp. 39-52.
    Spranger T, et al. How Different Constituents of Human Plasma and Low Density Lipoprotein Determine Plasma Oxidizability By Copper. Chem Phys Lipids. 1998;91(1):39-52. PubMed PMID: 9488998.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - How different constituents of human plasma and low density lipoprotein determine plasma oxidizability by copper. AU - Spranger,T, AU - Finckh,B, AU - Fingerhut,R, AU - Kohlschütter,A, AU - Beisiegel,U, AU - Kontush,A, PY - 1998/3/7/pubmed PY - 1998/3/7/medline PY - 1998/3/7/entrez SP - 39 EP - 52 JF - Chemistry and physics of lipids JO - Chem. Phys. Lipids VL - 91 IS - 1 N2 - Lipoprotein oxidation induced in vitro in whole plasma is expected to represent a more relevant model of the lipoprotein oxidation in the arterial wall than the in vitro oxidation of single isolated lipoproteins, e.g. low density lipoprotein (LDL). However, it remains unclear, how lipoprotein oxidation occurring in plasma is related to chemical composition and properties of the latter as well as to those of individual plasma lipoproteins. The present study was undertaken to characterize, how different constituents of human plasma contribute to the oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins oxidized directly in plasma samples. Oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins was assessed as oxidizability of whole heparin plasma and was measured spectrophotometrically as an increase in absorbance at 234 nm. To relate plasma oxidizability to its chemical composition and properties, plasma hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants, fatty acids, total lipids and TRAP were measured. To relate plasma oxidizability to the properties of individual lipoproteins, chemical composition and oxidizability were evaluated for LDL. We found that the oxidation kinetics of heparin plasma (diluted 150-fold and oxidized by 50 microM Cu2+) was characterized by three consecutive phases similar to the lag-, propagation and decomposition phases of LDL oxidation. Plasma oxidizability measured as different characteristics of these phases correlated negatively with plasma initial SH-groups, albumin, ascorbate, bilirubin, alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, free cholesterol, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid content and positively with plasma initial total cholesterol, cholesterol ester and polyunsaturated fatty acid content. Plasma oxidizability measured as a rate of conjugated diene accumulation after different periods of oxidation correlated negatively with plasma initial albumin, urate, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene content. A positive correlation between oxidizabilities of whole plasma and LDL (isolated from the same plasma samples and oxidized by 14 mol Cu2+/mol LDL) was found. These data show that the oxidizability of plasma samples is critically determined by their chemical composition. They also suggest that the plasma oxidizability measured as an increase in absorbance at 234 nm may be used as a practical measure of the oxidizability of plasma lipoproteins. SN - 0009-3084 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9488998/How_different_constituents_of_human_plasma_and_low_density_lipoprotein_determine_plasma_oxidizability_by_copper_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0009-3084(97)00092-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -