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The life-time rates of three major mood disorders and four major anxiety disorders in alcoholics and controls.
Addiction. 1997 Oct; 92(10):1289-304.A

Abstract

AIMS

While psychiatric symptoms are common in the general population and even more prevalent in alcoholics, their clinical implications are not clear. The goal of this study was to establish the life-time rates of several independent and concurrent mood and anxiety disorders in alcoholics, controls and their relatives.

DESIGN

Structured interviews were administered to alcoholics entering treatment, their relatives, and controls.

SETTING

The study was carried out in six different centers in the United States as part of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA).

PARTICIPANTS

Data were gathered from 2713 alcohol dependent subjects (probands and their alcoholic relatives) and 919 controls.

MEASUREMENTS

The timeline-based Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA) interview was administered face to face by trained, closely supervised interviewers. The life-time rates for concurrent and independent disorders were determined for three DSM-III-R major mood and four major anxiety disorders.

FINDINGS

Some form of independent mood disorder was seen during the life-time in slightly fewer alcoholics than controls (14.0% and 17.1%), but alcoholics did show higher rates of independent bipolar disorder (2.3% vs. 1.0%). The life-time rate for independent anxiety disorders was significantly higher in alcoholics than controls (9.4% vs. 3.7%), with most of the differential related to panic disorder (4.2% vs. 1.0%) and social phobia (3.2% vs. 1.4%), but no significant group differences for agoraphobia or obsessive-compulsive disorder. In general, these findings regarding mood and anxiety disorders were reflected in close relatives.

CONCLUSIONS

The large majority of alcohol-dependent men and women in this sample did not have any of the independent mood or anxiety disorders evaluated here. However, there was evidence of enhanced risks among alcoholics for independent bipolar, panic and social phobic disorders. Studies which do not distinguish carefully between independent and concurrent mood and anxiety disorders in alcoholics are likely to report much higher rates of co-morbid psychiatric disorders than those that distinguish between the two types of syndromes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry (116A), Veterans Affairs Medical Center (116A), University of California, San Diego 92161-2002, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9489046

Citation

Schuckit, M A., et al. "The Life-time Rates of Three Major Mood Disorders and Four Major Anxiety Disorders in Alcoholics and Controls." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 92, no. 10, 1997, pp. 1289-304.
Schuckit MA, Tipp JE, Bucholz KK, et al. The life-time rates of three major mood disorders and four major anxiety disorders in alcoholics and controls. Addiction. 1997;92(10):1289-304.
Schuckit, M. A., Tipp, J. E., Bucholz, K. K., Nurnberger, J. I., Hesselbrock, V. M., Crowe, R. R., & Kramer, J. (1997). The life-time rates of three major mood disorders and four major anxiety disorders in alcoholics and controls. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 92(10), 1289-304.
Schuckit MA, et al. The Life-time Rates of Three Major Mood Disorders and Four Major Anxiety Disorders in Alcoholics and Controls. Addiction. 1997;92(10):1289-304. PubMed PMID: 9489046.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The life-time rates of three major mood disorders and four major anxiety disorders in alcoholics and controls. AU - Schuckit,M A, AU - Tipp,J E, AU - Bucholz,K K, AU - Nurnberger,J I,Jr AU - Hesselbrock,V M, AU - Crowe,R R, AU - Kramer,J, PY - 1998/3/7/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/3/7/entrez SP - 1289 EP - 304 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 92 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: While psychiatric symptoms are common in the general population and even more prevalent in alcoholics, their clinical implications are not clear. The goal of this study was to establish the life-time rates of several independent and concurrent mood and anxiety disorders in alcoholics, controls and their relatives. DESIGN: Structured interviews were administered to alcoholics entering treatment, their relatives, and controls. SETTING: The study was carried out in six different centers in the United States as part of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). PARTICIPANTS: Data were gathered from 2713 alcohol dependent subjects (probands and their alcoholic relatives) and 919 controls. MEASUREMENTS: The timeline-based Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA) interview was administered face to face by trained, closely supervised interviewers. The life-time rates for concurrent and independent disorders were determined for three DSM-III-R major mood and four major anxiety disorders. FINDINGS: Some form of independent mood disorder was seen during the life-time in slightly fewer alcoholics than controls (14.0% and 17.1%), but alcoholics did show higher rates of independent bipolar disorder (2.3% vs. 1.0%). The life-time rate for independent anxiety disorders was significantly higher in alcoholics than controls (9.4% vs. 3.7%), with most of the differential related to panic disorder (4.2% vs. 1.0%) and social phobia (3.2% vs. 1.4%), but no significant group differences for agoraphobia or obsessive-compulsive disorder. In general, these findings regarding mood and anxiety disorders were reflected in close relatives. CONCLUSIONS: The large majority of alcohol-dependent men and women in this sample did not have any of the independent mood or anxiety disorders evaluated here. However, there was evidence of enhanced risks among alcoholics for independent bipolar, panic and social phobic disorders. Studies which do not distinguish carefully between independent and concurrent mood and anxiety disorders in alcoholics are likely to report much higher rates of co-morbid psychiatric disorders than those that distinguish between the two types of syndromes. SN - 0965-2140 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9489046/The_life_time_rates_of_three_major_mood_disorders_and_four_major_anxiety_disorders_in_alcoholics_and_controls_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0965-2140&date=1997&volume=92&issue=10&spage=1289 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -