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Long-term effects of calcium supplementation on serum parathyroid hormone level, bone turnover, and bone loss in elderly women.
J Bone Miner Res. 1998 Feb; 13(2):168-74.JB

Abstract

We report a 4-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 236 normal postmenopausal women (mean age +/- SE, 66.3+/-0.2 years) who were randomized to a calcium (1600 mg/day as the citrate) or placebo group. The women were seen every 6 months; 177 completed the trial. Net percentage changes in each group are given relative to baseline. The differences in net percentage changes (calcium group minus placebo group) in medians were: for lumbar spine bone density, 2.0% (p < 0.001) at year 1 and 0.3% (not significant) at year 4; for proximal femur bone density, 1.3% (p = 0.003) at year 1 and 1.3% (p = 0.015) at year 4; and for total body bone mineral, 0.4% (p = 0.002) at year 1 and 0.9% (p = 0.017) at year 4. Similar differences at year 4 were: -18.9% (p = 0.002) for parathyroid hormone (PTH), -11.9% (p = 0.026) for serum osteocalcin, and -32.2% (p = 0.003) for urine free pyridinoline. We conclude that long-term administration of calcium supplements to elderly women partially reverses age-related increases in serum PTH level and bone resorption and decreases bone loss. However, the effects on bone loss were weaker than those reported for estrogen, bisphosphonates, or calcitonin therapy, indicating that calcium supplements alone cannot substitute for these in treating established osteoporosis. Nonetheless, because of their safety, high tolerance, and low expense, calcium supplements may be a useful preventive measure for elderly postmenopausal women whose bone mineral density values are normal for their age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9495509

Citation

Riggs, B L., et al. "Long-term Effects of Calcium Supplementation On Serum Parathyroid Hormone Level, Bone Turnover, and Bone Loss in Elderly Women." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 13, no. 2, 1998, pp. 168-74.
Riggs BL, O'Fallon WM, Muhs J, et al. Long-term effects of calcium supplementation on serum parathyroid hormone level, bone turnover, and bone loss in elderly women. J Bone Miner Res. 1998;13(2):168-74.
Riggs, B. L., O'Fallon, W. M., Muhs, J., O'Connor, M. K., Kumar, R., & Melton, L. J. (1998). Long-term effects of calcium supplementation on serum parathyroid hormone level, bone turnover, and bone loss in elderly women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 13(2), 168-74.
Riggs BL, et al. Long-term Effects of Calcium Supplementation On Serum Parathyroid Hormone Level, Bone Turnover, and Bone Loss in Elderly Women. J Bone Miner Res. 1998;13(2):168-74. PubMed PMID: 9495509.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effects of calcium supplementation on serum parathyroid hormone level, bone turnover, and bone loss in elderly women. AU - Riggs,B L, AU - O'Fallon,W M, AU - Muhs,J, AU - O'Connor,M K, AU - Kumar,R, AU - Melton,L J,3rd PY - 1998/3/12/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/3/12/entrez SP - 168 EP - 74 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J Bone Miner Res VL - 13 IS - 2 N2 - We report a 4-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 236 normal postmenopausal women (mean age +/- SE, 66.3+/-0.2 years) who were randomized to a calcium (1600 mg/day as the citrate) or placebo group. The women were seen every 6 months; 177 completed the trial. Net percentage changes in each group are given relative to baseline. The differences in net percentage changes (calcium group minus placebo group) in medians were: for lumbar spine bone density, 2.0% (p < 0.001) at year 1 and 0.3% (not significant) at year 4; for proximal femur bone density, 1.3% (p = 0.003) at year 1 and 1.3% (p = 0.015) at year 4; and for total body bone mineral, 0.4% (p = 0.002) at year 1 and 0.9% (p = 0.017) at year 4. Similar differences at year 4 were: -18.9% (p = 0.002) for parathyroid hormone (PTH), -11.9% (p = 0.026) for serum osteocalcin, and -32.2% (p = 0.003) for urine free pyridinoline. We conclude that long-term administration of calcium supplements to elderly women partially reverses age-related increases in serum PTH level and bone resorption and decreases bone loss. However, the effects on bone loss were weaker than those reported for estrogen, bisphosphonates, or calcitonin therapy, indicating that calcium supplements alone cannot substitute for these in treating established osteoporosis. Nonetheless, because of their safety, high tolerance, and low expense, calcium supplements may be a useful preventive measure for elderly postmenopausal women whose bone mineral density values are normal for their age. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9495509/Long_term_effects_of_calcium_supplementation_on_serum_parathyroid_hormone_level_bone_turnover_and_bone_loss_in_elderly_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.1998.13.2.168 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -