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Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection by urine tests among adolescents clinics.
J Adolesc Health 1998; 22(3):197-204JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To compare urine ligase and polymerase chain reaction (LCR, PCR) tests for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection with PCR and nucleic acid probe (GPA) on cervical specimens in adolescents, as well as risk factors for C. trachomatis infection and prevalence of infection at enrollment.

METHODS

Urine and cervical specimens were collected from women aged 13-20 years attending adolescent clinics, and interviews were administered. Urine specimens were tested by PCR and LCR, and cervical specimens by GPA and PCR. Prevalence rates of C. trachomatis infection and gonorrhea were compared by demographic, behavioral, and clinical risk factors.

RESULTS

Of 415 women tested, 86 (20.7%) were infected with C. trachomatis as indicated by positive cervical PCR results. A higher prevalence of C. trachomatis infection was seen among adolescents who douched monthly or more frequently, or had gonorrhea; prevalence declined from 25.8% in the first 7 months to 16.3% in the last 14 months of the study (p = .017). A statistically significant protective effect for reported condom use was not observed. Sensitivity of urine PCR was 89.5% and specificity was 100% relative to cervical PCR, compared to 84.9% and 99.4% (urine LCR) and 65.4% and 98.0% (cervical GPA). Sensitivity of urine PCR was higher in women with discharge; urine LCR sensitivity was higher in women < 19 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS

Polymerase chain reaction and LCR assays on urine specimens were sensitive, specific, and noninvasive tests in this population of adolescents with high C. trachomatis infection prevalence. Chlamydia trachomatis infection was associated with douching monthly or more frequently. Prevalence of infection declined over the period during which the study was conducted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Minority and Women's Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9502006

Citation

Beck-Sague, C M., et al. "Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis Cervical Infection By Urine Tests Among Adolescents Clinics." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 22, no. 3, 1998, pp. 197-204.
Beck-Sague CM, Farshy CE, Jackson TK, et al. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection by urine tests among adolescents clinics. J Adolesc Health. 1998;22(3):197-204.
Beck-Sague, C. M., Farshy, C. E., Jackson, T. K., Guillory, L., Edelkind, D., Bullard, J. C., ... Black, C. M. (1998). Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection by urine tests among adolescents clinics. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 22(3), pp. 197-204.
Beck-Sague CM, et al. Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis Cervical Infection By Urine Tests Among Adolescents Clinics. J Adolesc Health. 1998;22(3):197-204. PubMed PMID: 9502006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection by urine tests among adolescents clinics. AU - Beck-Sague,C M, AU - Farshy,C E, AU - Jackson,T K, AU - Guillory,L, AU - Edelkind,D, AU - Bullard,J C, AU - Urdez,E A, AU - Jones,B, AU - Francis,K, AU - Sievert,A, AU - Morse,S A, AU - Black,C M, PY - 1998/3/21/pubmed PY - 1998/3/21/medline PY - 1998/3/21/entrez SP - 197 EP - 204 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To compare urine ligase and polymerase chain reaction (LCR, PCR) tests for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection with PCR and nucleic acid probe (GPA) on cervical specimens in adolescents, as well as risk factors for C. trachomatis infection and prevalence of infection at enrollment. METHODS: Urine and cervical specimens were collected from women aged 13-20 years attending adolescent clinics, and interviews were administered. Urine specimens were tested by PCR and LCR, and cervical specimens by GPA and PCR. Prevalence rates of C. trachomatis infection and gonorrhea were compared by demographic, behavioral, and clinical risk factors. RESULTS: Of 415 women tested, 86 (20.7%) were infected with C. trachomatis as indicated by positive cervical PCR results. A higher prevalence of C. trachomatis infection was seen among adolescents who douched monthly or more frequently, or had gonorrhea; prevalence declined from 25.8% in the first 7 months to 16.3% in the last 14 months of the study (p = .017). A statistically significant protective effect for reported condom use was not observed. Sensitivity of urine PCR was 89.5% and specificity was 100% relative to cervical PCR, compared to 84.9% and 99.4% (urine LCR) and 65.4% and 98.0% (cervical GPA). Sensitivity of urine PCR was higher in women with discharge; urine LCR sensitivity was higher in women < 19 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Polymerase chain reaction and LCR assays on urine specimens were sensitive, specific, and noninvasive tests in this population of adolescents with high C. trachomatis infection prevalence. Chlamydia trachomatis infection was associated with douching monthly or more frequently. Prevalence of infection declined over the period during which the study was conducted. SN - 1054-139X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9502006/Detection_of_Chlamydia_trachomatis_cervical_infection_by_urine_tests_among_adolescents_clinics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(97)00209-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -