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A prospective study of dietary fiber types and symptomatic diverticular disease in men.
J Nutr 1998; 128(4):714-9JN

Abstract

To examine prospectively dietary fiber calculated from food composition values based on analytic techniques and specific dietary fiber types in relation to risk of diverticular disease, we analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 43,881 U.S. male health professionals 40-75 y of age at base line; subjects were free of diagnosed diverticular disease, colon or rectal polyps, ulcerative colitis and cancer. The insoluble component of fiber was inversely associated with risk of diverticular disease relative risk (RR) = 0. 63, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-0.91, P for trend = 0.02, and this association was particularly strong for cellulose (RR = 0.52, 95% CI, 0.36-0.75, P for trend = 0.002). The association between diverticular disease and total dietary fiber intake calculated from the AOACstandards method was not appreciably different from results using the Southgate or Englyst method [for AOAC method, RR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.41-0.87; for Southgate method, RR = 0.61, 95% CI, 0.42-0. 88; for Englyst method, RR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.42-0.87, for the highest quintiles]. Our findings provide evidence for the hypothesis that a diet high in dietary fiber decreases the risk of diverticular disease, and this result was not sensitive to the use of different analytic techniques to define dietary fiber. Our findings suggest that the insoluble component of fiber was significantly associated with a decreased risk of diverticular disease, and this inverse association was particularly strong for cellulose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9521633

Citation

Aldoori, W H., et al. "A Prospective Study of Dietary Fiber Types and Symptomatic Diverticular Disease in Men." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 128, no. 4, 1998, pp. 714-9.
Aldoori WH, Giovannucci EL, Rockett HR, et al. A prospective study of dietary fiber types and symptomatic diverticular disease in men. J Nutr. 1998;128(4):714-9.
Aldoori, W. H., Giovannucci, E. L., Rockett, H. R., Sampson, L., Rimm, E. B., & Willett, W. C. (1998). A prospective study of dietary fiber types and symptomatic diverticular disease in men. The Journal of Nutrition, 128(4), pp. 714-9.
Aldoori WH, et al. A Prospective Study of Dietary Fiber Types and Symptomatic Diverticular Disease in Men. J Nutr. 1998;128(4):714-9. PubMed PMID: 9521633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of dietary fiber types and symptomatic diverticular disease in men. AU - Aldoori,W H, AU - Giovannucci,E L, AU - Rockett,H R, AU - Sampson,L, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Willett,W C, PY - 1998/5/16/pubmed PY - 1998/5/16/medline PY - 1998/5/16/entrez SP - 714 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 128 IS - 4 N2 - To examine prospectively dietary fiber calculated from food composition values based on analytic techniques and specific dietary fiber types in relation to risk of diverticular disease, we analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 43,881 U.S. male health professionals 40-75 y of age at base line; subjects were free of diagnosed diverticular disease, colon or rectal polyps, ulcerative colitis and cancer. The insoluble component of fiber was inversely associated with risk of diverticular disease relative risk (RR) = 0. 63, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-0.91, P for trend = 0.02, and this association was particularly strong for cellulose (RR = 0.52, 95% CI, 0.36-0.75, P for trend = 0.002). The association between diverticular disease and total dietary fiber intake calculated from the AOACstandards method was not appreciably different from results using the Southgate or Englyst method [for AOAC method, RR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.41-0.87; for Southgate method, RR = 0.61, 95% CI, 0.42-0. 88; for Englyst method, RR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.42-0.87, for the highest quintiles]. Our findings provide evidence for the hypothesis that a diet high in dietary fiber decreases the risk of diverticular disease, and this result was not sensitive to the use of different analytic techniques to define dietary fiber. Our findings suggest that the insoluble component of fiber was significantly associated with a decreased risk of diverticular disease, and this inverse association was particularly strong for cellulose. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9521633/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/128.4.714 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -