Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Iron supplementation does not affect cell proliferation or aberrant crypt foci development in the colon of sprague-dawley rats.
J Nutr 1998; 128(4):764-70JN

Abstract

It has been suggested that high iron stores enhance colon carcinogenesis. The effect of high dietary iron (Fe) on indices of iron, copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) status, lipid peroxidation using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione transferase and ceruloplasmin activities, cell proliferation and development of preneoplastic lesions known as aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon was examined using a 3 x 2 factorial design. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed adequate (AFe; 45 mg Fe/kg diet), moderately high (MHFe; 225 mg Fe/kg diet) and high (HFe; 450 mg Fe/kg diet) dietary Fe for 2.5 wk, then treated with azoxymethane (AOM; 2 injections, 1 wk apart; total dose 30 mg/kg body weight) or saline (n = 14-15 per group). Dietary treatment continued for another 6 wk after the second AOM dose. At the time of AOM injection, colon Fe concentrations were one- and threefold higher for MHFe and HFe rats, respectively, than for AFe rats. It was proposed that high dietary Fe would adversely affect Cu and Mn status, resulting in impaired antioxidant enzyme activity. However, neither indices of Cu and Mn status nor colonic mucosal antioxidant enzyme activities were affected by dietary Fe except for plasma ceruloplasmin activity, which was slightly lower in rats fed high iron diets than in rats fed adequate iron diets (P < 0.01). Dietary Fe had no significant effect on colonic mucosal lipid peroxidation, cell proliferation or ACF development. In conclusion, our findings suggest that dietary Fe concentrations that are approximately 5 and 10 times adequate do not enhance oxidative stress, cell proliferation and ACF development in the colon of rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9521641

Citation

Soyars, K E., and J G. Fischer. "Iron Supplementation Does Not Affect Cell Proliferation or Aberrant Crypt Foci Development in the Colon of Sprague-dawley Rats." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 128, no. 4, 1998, pp. 764-70.
Soyars KE, Fischer JG. Iron supplementation does not affect cell proliferation or aberrant crypt foci development in the colon of sprague-dawley rats. J Nutr. 1998;128(4):764-70.
Soyars, K. E., & Fischer, J. G. (1998). Iron supplementation does not affect cell proliferation or aberrant crypt foci development in the colon of sprague-dawley rats. The Journal of Nutrition, 128(4), pp. 764-70.
Soyars KE, Fischer JG. Iron Supplementation Does Not Affect Cell Proliferation or Aberrant Crypt Foci Development in the Colon of Sprague-dawley Rats. J Nutr. 1998;128(4):764-70. PubMed PMID: 9521641.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron supplementation does not affect cell proliferation or aberrant crypt foci development in the colon of sprague-dawley rats. AU - Soyars,K E, AU - Fischer,J G, PY - 1998/5/16/pubmed PY - 1998/5/16/medline PY - 1998/5/16/entrez SP - 764 EP - 70 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 128 IS - 4 N2 - It has been suggested that high iron stores enhance colon carcinogenesis. The effect of high dietary iron (Fe) on indices of iron, copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) status, lipid peroxidation using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione transferase and ceruloplasmin activities, cell proliferation and development of preneoplastic lesions known as aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon was examined using a 3 x 2 factorial design. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed adequate (AFe; 45 mg Fe/kg diet), moderately high (MHFe; 225 mg Fe/kg diet) and high (HFe; 450 mg Fe/kg diet) dietary Fe for 2.5 wk, then treated with azoxymethane (AOM; 2 injections, 1 wk apart; total dose 30 mg/kg body weight) or saline (n = 14-15 per group). Dietary treatment continued for another 6 wk after the second AOM dose. At the time of AOM injection, colon Fe concentrations were one- and threefold higher for MHFe and HFe rats, respectively, than for AFe rats. It was proposed that high dietary Fe would adversely affect Cu and Mn status, resulting in impaired antioxidant enzyme activity. However, neither indices of Cu and Mn status nor colonic mucosal antioxidant enzyme activities were affected by dietary Fe except for plasma ceruloplasmin activity, which was slightly lower in rats fed high iron diets than in rats fed adequate iron diets (P < 0.01). Dietary Fe had no significant effect on colonic mucosal lipid peroxidation, cell proliferation or ACF development. In conclusion, our findings suggest that dietary Fe concentrations that are approximately 5 and 10 times adequate do not enhance oxidative stress, cell proliferation and ACF development in the colon of rats. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9521641/Iron_supplementation_does_not_affect_cell_proliferation_or_aberrant_crypt_foci_development_in_the_colon_of_sprague_dawley_rats_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/128.4.764 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -