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Storage of extemporaneously prepared ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions.
Am J Health Syst Pharm 1998; 55(5):463-6AJ

Abstract

The feasibility of long-term storage of commonly used ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions was studied. Solutions of tobramycin 15 mg/mL (as the sulfate salt), cefazolin 33 mg/mL (as the sodium salt), and vancomycin 50 mg/mL (as the hydrochloride salt), each in artificial tears, were prepared with aseptic technique. Ten 15-mL portions of each solution were prepared; five of each were stored at 4 degrees C and the other five at 25 degrees C. Samples of each portion were tested before storage and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after preparation for osmolality, pH, and antimicrobial activity. For the tobramycin solution there were no differences in osmolality or the zone of inhibition associated with temperature or time. The pH dropped between days 0 and 7 at both temperatures. For the cefazolin solution there were no differences in osmolality associated with temperature or time. The pH was higher in portions stored at 25 degrees C than at 4 degrees C and increased over time in portions stored at either temperature. The zone of inhibition was larger for portions stored at 4 degrees C than at 25 degrees C but did not change over time. For the vancomycin solution there were no differences in osmolality associated with temperature or time. The pH did not differ between portions stored at 4 and 25 degrees C but dropped sharply at both temperatures between days 0 and 7. The zone of inhibition did not differ with temperature or time. The tobramycin solution could be stored for 28 days at room temperature and the cefazolin solution for 28 days under refrigeration. The pH of the vancomycin solution changed too quickly for storage to be recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9522930

Citation

Charlton, J F., et al. "Storage of Extemporaneously Prepared Ophthalmic Antimicrobial Solutions." American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy : AJHP : Official Journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, vol. 55, no. 5, 1998, pp. 463-6.
Charlton JF, Dalla KP, Kniska A. Storage of extemporaneously prepared ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 1998;55(5):463-6.
Charlton, J. F., Dalla, K. P., & Kniska, A. (1998). Storage of extemporaneously prepared ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions. American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy : AJHP : Official Journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, 55(5), pp. 463-6.
Charlton JF, Dalla KP, Kniska A. Storage of Extemporaneously Prepared Ophthalmic Antimicrobial Solutions. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 1998 Mar 1;55(5):463-6. PubMed PMID: 9522930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Storage of extemporaneously prepared ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions. AU - Charlton,J F, AU - Dalla,K P, AU - Kniska,A, PY - 1998/4/2/pubmed PY - 1998/4/2/medline PY - 1998/4/2/entrez SP - 463 EP - 6 JF - American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists JO - Am J Health Syst Pharm VL - 55 IS - 5 N2 - The feasibility of long-term storage of commonly used ophthalmic antimicrobial solutions was studied. Solutions of tobramycin 15 mg/mL (as the sulfate salt), cefazolin 33 mg/mL (as the sodium salt), and vancomycin 50 mg/mL (as the hydrochloride salt), each in artificial tears, were prepared with aseptic technique. Ten 15-mL portions of each solution were prepared; five of each were stored at 4 degrees C and the other five at 25 degrees C. Samples of each portion were tested before storage and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after preparation for osmolality, pH, and antimicrobial activity. For the tobramycin solution there were no differences in osmolality or the zone of inhibition associated with temperature or time. The pH dropped between days 0 and 7 at both temperatures. For the cefazolin solution there were no differences in osmolality associated with temperature or time. The pH was higher in portions stored at 25 degrees C than at 4 degrees C and increased over time in portions stored at either temperature. The zone of inhibition was larger for portions stored at 4 degrees C than at 25 degrees C but did not change over time. For the vancomycin solution there were no differences in osmolality associated with temperature or time. The pH did not differ between portions stored at 4 and 25 degrees C but dropped sharply at both temperatures between days 0 and 7. The zone of inhibition did not differ with temperature or time. The tobramycin solution could be stored for 28 days at room temperature and the cefazolin solution for 28 days under refrigeration. The pH of the vancomycin solution changed too quickly for storage to be recommended. SN - 1079-2082 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9522930/Storage_of_extemporaneously_prepared_ophthalmic_antimicrobial_solutions_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajhp/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajhp/55.5.463 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -