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Bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion.
Am J Clin Nutr 1998; 67(4):716-21AJ

Abstract

This randomized, controlled study evaluated the bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion. A mild vitamin K deficiency was induced in 12 healthy adult men and women by dietary restriction of phylloquinone (40 microg/d, days 1-11) and by administration of warfarin (1.0 mg/d, days 5-11). On day 11, subjects received a 500-mL intravenous solution of either lipid or saline, both of which contained 154 microg phylloquinone. Bioavailability was assessed by serial measurements of plasma phylloquinone, vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide. PIVKA-II (proteins induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II), and percentage undercarboxylated osteocalcin. As a result of vitamin K deficiency and minidose warfarin, vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide, PIVKA-II, and percentage undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased significantly between days 1 and 11 (P = 0.05, 0.016, and 0.001, respectively). With the infusions, plasma phylloquinone increased in both groups (P = 0.001). After the infusions vitamin K,-2,3-epoxide decreased in both groups (P = 0.002). Changes in plasma phylloquinone and vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide were no different in the two groups (mean areas under the curves +/- SEM: 116+/-13 nmol x h/L for the saline group and 102+/-20 nmol x h/L for the lipid group for phylloquinone; 38.6+/-7.5 nmol x h/L for the saline group and 31.3+/-9.0 nmol x h/L for the lipid group for vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide). PIVKA-II decreased significantly from baseline values (P = 0.005) in both groups after the infusions. Intravenous lipid reversed the effects of minidose warfarin and of dietary restriction of phylloquinone on hemostasis and vitamin K nutritional status. This reversal was no different from that seen with the infusion of phylloquinone in a saline solution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vitamin K Laboratory, The Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9537619

Citation

Camilo, M E., et al. "Bioavailability of Phylloquinone From an Intravenous Lipid Emulsion." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 67, no. 4, 1998, pp. 716-21.
Camilo ME, Jatoi A, O'Brien M, et al. Bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;67(4):716-21.
Camilo, M. E., Jatoi, A., O'Brien, M., Davidson, K., Sokoll, L., Sadowski, J. A., & Mason, J. B. (1998). Bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 67(4), pp. 716-21.
Camilo ME, et al. Bioavailability of Phylloquinone From an Intravenous Lipid Emulsion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;67(4):716-21. PubMed PMID: 9537619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion. AU - Camilo,M E, AU - Jatoi,A, AU - O'Brien,M, AU - Davidson,K, AU - Sokoll,L, AU - Sadowski,J A, AU - Mason,J B, PY - 1998/4/16/pubmed PY - 1998/4/16/medline PY - 1998/4/16/entrez SP - 716 EP - 21 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 67 IS - 4 N2 - This randomized, controlled study evaluated the bioavailability of phylloquinone from an intravenous lipid emulsion. A mild vitamin K deficiency was induced in 12 healthy adult men and women by dietary restriction of phylloquinone (40 microg/d, days 1-11) and by administration of warfarin (1.0 mg/d, days 5-11). On day 11, subjects received a 500-mL intravenous solution of either lipid or saline, both of which contained 154 microg phylloquinone. Bioavailability was assessed by serial measurements of plasma phylloquinone, vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide. PIVKA-II (proteins induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II), and percentage undercarboxylated osteocalcin. As a result of vitamin K deficiency and minidose warfarin, vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide, PIVKA-II, and percentage undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased significantly between days 1 and 11 (P = 0.05, 0.016, and 0.001, respectively). With the infusions, plasma phylloquinone increased in both groups (P = 0.001). After the infusions vitamin K,-2,3-epoxide decreased in both groups (P = 0.002). Changes in plasma phylloquinone and vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide were no different in the two groups (mean areas under the curves +/- SEM: 116+/-13 nmol x h/L for the saline group and 102+/-20 nmol x h/L for the lipid group for phylloquinone; 38.6+/-7.5 nmol x h/L for the saline group and 31.3+/-9.0 nmol x h/L for the lipid group for vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide). PIVKA-II decreased significantly from baseline values (P = 0.005) in both groups after the infusions. Intravenous lipid reversed the effects of minidose warfarin and of dietary restriction of phylloquinone on hemostasis and vitamin K nutritional status. This reversal was no different from that seen with the infusion of phylloquinone in a saline solution. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9537619/Bioavailability_of_phylloquinone_from_an_intravenous_lipid_emulsion_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/67.4.716 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -