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Plasma zinc status, growth, and maturation in children with sickle cell disease.
J Pediatr. 1998 Mar; 132(3 Pt 1):467-71.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine the relation of plasma zinc (Zn) status to growth and maturation in children with SS genotype sickle cell disease.

STUDY DESIGN

A cross-sectional study of 104 subjects who were 50% female and ranged in age from 0.4 to 18 years was performed. Measures included plasma Zn concentration (Znp), height, weight, skinfold thicknesses, elbow breadth, upper arm muscle area, and fat-free mass and fat mass by total body electrical conductivity. Skeletal maturation was assessed by hand-wrist x-ray evaluation and sexual maturation by Tanner stage.

RESULTS

A total of 44% of the patients had low Znp (<10.7 micromol/L [70 microg/dl]); those with low Znp had significantly lower SD scores for height (p = 0.003), weight (p = 0.003), upper arm muscle area (p = 0.045), fat-free mass (p = 0.025), and elbow breadth (p = 0.017) and greater skeletal maturation delay (p = 0.04). In older children (>9 years) low Znp was associated with decreased Tanner scores for pubic hair (p = 0.001) and breast and genital maturation (p = 0.009). No significant differences were seen in age, sex, or fat stores according to Zn status.

CONCLUSIONS

Decreased plasma Zn is common in children with SS genotype sickle cell disease and is associated with decreased linear growth, skeletal growth, muscle mass, and sexual and skeletal maturation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 19104, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9544903

Citation

Leonard, M B., et al. "Plasma Zinc Status, Growth, and Maturation in Children With Sickle Cell Disease." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 132, no. 3 Pt 1, 1998, pp. 467-71.
Leonard MB, Zemel BS, Kawchak DA, et al. Plasma zinc status, growth, and maturation in children with sickle cell disease. J Pediatr. 1998;132(3 Pt 1):467-71.
Leonard, M. B., Zemel, B. S., Kawchak, D. A., Ohene-Frempong, K., & Stallings, V. A. (1998). Plasma zinc status, growth, and maturation in children with sickle cell disease. The Journal of Pediatrics, 132(3 Pt 1), 467-71.
Leonard MB, et al. Plasma Zinc Status, Growth, and Maturation in Children With Sickle Cell Disease. J Pediatr. 1998;132(3 Pt 1):467-71. PubMed PMID: 9544903.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma zinc status, growth, and maturation in children with sickle cell disease. AU - Leonard,M B, AU - Zemel,B S, AU - Kawchak,D A, AU - Ohene-Frempong,K, AU - Stallings,V A, PY - 1998/4/17/pubmed PY - 1998/4/17/medline PY - 1998/4/17/entrez SP - 467 EP - 71 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 132 IS - 3 Pt 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the relation of plasma zinc (Zn) status to growth and maturation in children with SS genotype sickle cell disease. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study of 104 subjects who were 50% female and ranged in age from 0.4 to 18 years was performed. Measures included plasma Zn concentration (Znp), height, weight, skinfold thicknesses, elbow breadth, upper arm muscle area, and fat-free mass and fat mass by total body electrical conductivity. Skeletal maturation was assessed by hand-wrist x-ray evaluation and sexual maturation by Tanner stage. RESULTS: A total of 44% of the patients had low Znp (<10.7 micromol/L [70 microg/dl]); those with low Znp had significantly lower SD scores for height (p = 0.003), weight (p = 0.003), upper arm muscle area (p = 0.045), fat-free mass (p = 0.025), and elbow breadth (p = 0.017) and greater skeletal maturation delay (p = 0.04). In older children (>9 years) low Znp was associated with decreased Tanner scores for pubic hair (p = 0.001) and breast and genital maturation (p = 0.009). No significant differences were seen in age, sex, or fat stores according to Zn status. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased plasma Zn is common in children with SS genotype sickle cell disease and is associated with decreased linear growth, skeletal growth, muscle mass, and sexual and skeletal maturation. SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9544903/Plasma_zinc_status_growth_and_maturation_in_children_with_sickle_cell_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022347698001140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -