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Gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Abstract

Chronic GERD is an unremitting, incurable disorder that recurs rapidly upon discontinuation of therapy. Primary complications of GERD include esophagitis, esophageal stricture and Barrett esophagus. Current therapy focuses on modifying risk factors, inhibiting the production of acid and enhancing esophageal gastric motility. In patients with uncomplicated heartburn, nondrug therapy should be the initial therapeutic approach, with patient education a major step in promoting lifestyle changes and improving the outcome. Maintenance therapy is central to the management of GERD. If symptoms persist to suggest complicated disease, further diagnostic tests (endoscopy) are indicated. H2 receptor antagonists usually resolve symptoms in 50% to 70% of patients, and PPIs in 74% to 96% of patients. Agents that improve esophageal motility, such as cisapride, may provide symptomatic relief of heartburn, but healing effects are inconsistent. In refractory disease, therapy is individualized to the patient, and may include combination therapy, more aggressive single line therapy or an appropriate surgical approach.

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MeSH

Barrett Esophagus
Esophageal Stenosis
Esophagitis, Peptic
Fundoplication
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Histamine H2 Antagonists
Humans
Life Style
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Risk Factors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9559205

Citation

Williams, C N.. "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease." Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology = Journal Canadien De Gastroenterologie, vol. 12, no. 2, 1998, pp. 107-8.
Williams CN. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. Can J Gastroenterol. 1998;12(2):107-8.
Williams, C. N. (1998). Gastroesophageal reflux disease. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology = Journal Canadien De Gastroenterologie, 12(2), pp. 107-8.
Williams CN. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Can J Gastroenterol. 1998;12(2):107-8. PubMed PMID: 9559205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gastroesophageal reflux disease. A1 - Williams,C N, PY - 1998/4/29/pubmed PY - 1998/4/29/medline PY - 1998/4/29/entrez SP - 107 EP - 8 JF - Canadian journal of gastroenterology = Journal canadien de gastroenterologie JO - Can. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - Chronic GERD is an unremitting, incurable disorder that recurs rapidly upon discontinuation of therapy. Primary complications of GERD include esophagitis, esophageal stricture and Barrett esophagus. Current therapy focuses on modifying risk factors, inhibiting the production of acid and enhancing esophageal gastric motility. In patients with uncomplicated heartburn, nondrug therapy should be the initial therapeutic approach, with patient education a major step in promoting lifestyle changes and improving the outcome. Maintenance therapy is central to the management of GERD. If symptoms persist to suggest complicated disease, further diagnostic tests (endoscopy) are indicated. H2 receptor antagonists usually resolve symptoms in 50% to 70% of patients, and PPIs in 74% to 96% of patients. Agents that improve esophageal motility, such as cisapride, may provide symptomatic relief of heartburn, but healing effects are inconsistent. In refractory disease, therapy is individualized to the patient, and may include combination therapy, more aggressive single line therapy or an appropriate surgical approach. SN - 0835-7900 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9559205/Gastroesophageal_reflux_disease_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2996 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -