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A profile of the adolescent male family planning client.
Fam Plann Perspect. 1998 Mar-Apr; 30(2):63-6, 88.FP

Abstract

CONTEXT

Family planning programs and policies increasingly focus on the male partner's roles and responsibilities in contraceptive decision-making and use. To effectively tailor services for males, policymakers and providers must refine their understanding of men's psychosocial and reproductive health needs.

METHODS

Using self-administered questionnaires, 1,540 sexually active males aged 19 and younger who attended family planning clinics in California provided information about their sexual behavior, contraceptive use, pregnancy and parenting history, and psychosocial characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors that contributed to effective contraceptive use.

RESULTS

Although 73% of participants reported having used a birth control method at first intercourse, only 59% said that they or their partner had used an effective method at last intercourse, and 35% had used no method. If the client was uncomfortable with his method, the odds that he had used an effective method at last intercourse were reduced (odds ratio, 0.4). The likelihood of use at last intercourse was increased among males who agreed with their partner about their method and those who had never impregnated a partner (1.4 and 1.9, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

To adequately serve young males, clinics must take into account their sexual and contraceptive histories. But screening should go beyond traditional family planning techniques to discuss how to improve communication with partners and other lifestyle issues that may interfere with consistent use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Reproductive Health Policy Research, Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9561870

Citation

Brindis, C, et al. "A Profile of the Adolescent Male Family Planning Client." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 30, no. 2, 1998, pp. 63-6, 88.
Brindis C, Boggess J, Katsuranis F, et al. A profile of the adolescent male family planning client. Fam Plann Perspect. 1998;30(2):63-6, 88.
Brindis, C., Boggess, J., Katsuranis, F., Mantell, M., McCarter, V., & Wolfe, A. (1998). A profile of the adolescent male family planning client. Family Planning Perspectives, 30(2), 63-6, 88.
Brindis C, et al. A Profile of the Adolescent Male Family Planning Client. Fam Plann Perspect. 1998 Mar-Apr;30(2):63-6, 88. PubMed PMID: 9561870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A profile of the adolescent male family planning client. AU - Brindis,C, AU - Boggess,J, AU - Katsuranis,F, AU - Mantell,M, AU - McCarter,V, AU - Wolfe,A, PY - 1998/4/30/pubmed PY - 1998/4/30/medline PY - 1998/4/30/entrez KW - Adolescent Pregnancy KW - Adolescents KW - Adolescents, Male KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Behavior KW - California KW - Clients--men KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Usage--men KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Family Planning KW - Family Planning Programs KW - Fertility KW - First Intercourse--men KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Organization And Administration KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Premarital Sex Behavior--men KW - Program Activities KW - Programs KW - Reproductive Behavior KW - Research Report KW - Risk Reduction Behavior--men KW - Sex Behavior KW - United States KW - Youth SP - 63-6, 88 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - CONTEXT: Family planning programs and policies increasingly focus on the male partner's roles and responsibilities in contraceptive decision-making and use. To effectively tailor services for males, policymakers and providers must refine their understanding of men's psychosocial and reproductive health needs. METHODS: Using self-administered questionnaires, 1,540 sexually active males aged 19 and younger who attended family planning clinics in California provided information about their sexual behavior, contraceptive use, pregnancy and parenting history, and psychosocial characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors that contributed to effective contraceptive use. RESULTS: Although 73% of participants reported having used a birth control method at first intercourse, only 59% said that they or their partner had used an effective method at last intercourse, and 35% had used no method. If the client was uncomfortable with his method, the odds that he had used an effective method at last intercourse were reduced (odds ratio, 0.4). The likelihood of use at last intercourse was increased among males who agreed with their partner about their method and those who had never impregnated a partner (1.4 and 1.9, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: To adequately serve young males, clinics must take into account their sexual and contraceptive histories. But screening should go beyond traditional family planning techniques to discuss how to improve communication with partners and other lifestyle issues that may interfere with consistent use. SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9561870/A_profile_of_the_adolescent_male_family_planning_client_ L2 - https://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3006398.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -