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Cord blood mononuclear cells and milk-specific T-cell clones are tools to evaluate the residual immunogenicity of hydrolyzed milk formulas.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1998 Apr; 101(4 Pt 1):514-20.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hydrolyzed milk formulas (HFs) are given to infants allergic to cow's milk proteins and, for preventive reasons, to atopy-prone newborns for which breast feeding is not feasible. The ultimate properties of HFs are not only a reduced allergenicity but also decreased immunogenic capacity combined with good taste and caloric value. No information is available concerning the capacity of HFs to induce immune responses.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine the residual immunogenic capacity of partially (pHF) and extensively hydrolyzed milk formula (eHF), and we studied the cellular reactivity of cord blood-derived (n = 71) mononuclear cells induced by 10 different HFs.

METHODS

To test the effect of HF on T-helper cells, beta-casein-specific T-cell clones (TCCs, n = 21) from individuals allergic to milk were established, and T-cell proliferation and cytokine profiles (interferon-gamma and IL-4) were determined on stimulation with HF.

RESULTS

We found significantly reduced proliferative responses of eHF compared with milk proteins. Whey-based pHF displayed the same proliferative capacity as unmodified milk proteins. As expected, extensively processed whey products displayed lower cellular responses compared with partially hydrolyzed products (pHF whey vs eHF whey, p < 0.0001). No difference in cellular response was found between casein-based pHF and casein-based eHF. Beta-casein-specific TCCs (n = 21) proliferated in response to casein-derived hydrolysates (14% with casein/whey-based pHF, 4% with casein-based pHF, and 0% with casein-based eHF). Whey-based pHF was also found to induce proliferation in beta-casein-specific TCCs, indicating the presence or the generation of peptides displaying cross-reactivity with these whey-derived hydrolysates. TCCs stimulated with whey- or casein-based pHF or eHF produced the same amount of cytokines (IL-4, interferon-gamma) as the same clones stimulated with unmodified products.

CONCLUSION

Our data indicate that whey- and casein-derived eHFs display highly reduced immunogenic properties at the T-cell level. In contrast, pHFs display residual immunogenic properties detectable at the T-cell level, reflecting a potential for the induction of pathogenetically important T-cell responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Vienna, Austria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9564805

Citation

Szépfalusi, Z, et al. "Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells and Milk-specific T-cell Clones Are Tools to Evaluate the Residual Immunogenicity of Hydrolyzed Milk Formulas." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 101, no. 4 Pt 1, 1998, pp. 514-20.
Szépfalusi Z, Nentwich I, Jost E, et al. Cord blood mononuclear cells and milk-specific T-cell clones are tools to evaluate the residual immunogenicity of hydrolyzed milk formulas. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1998;101(4 Pt 1):514-20.
Szépfalusi, Z., Nentwich, I., Jost, E., Gerstmayr, M., Ebner, C., Frischer, T., & Urbanek, R. (1998). Cord blood mononuclear cells and milk-specific T-cell clones are tools to evaluate the residual immunogenicity of hydrolyzed milk formulas. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 101(4 Pt 1), 514-20.
Szépfalusi Z, et al. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells and Milk-specific T-cell Clones Are Tools to Evaluate the Residual Immunogenicity of Hydrolyzed Milk Formulas. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1998;101(4 Pt 1):514-20. PubMed PMID: 9564805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cord blood mononuclear cells and milk-specific T-cell clones are tools to evaluate the residual immunogenicity of hydrolyzed milk formulas. AU - Szépfalusi,Z, AU - Nentwich,I, AU - Jost,E, AU - Gerstmayr,M, AU - Ebner,C, AU - Frischer,T, AU - Urbanek,R, PY - 1998/5/9/pubmed PY - 1998/5/9/medline PY - 1998/5/9/entrez SP - 514 EP - 20 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 101 IS - 4 Pt 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hydrolyzed milk formulas (HFs) are given to infants allergic to cow's milk proteins and, for preventive reasons, to atopy-prone newborns for which breast feeding is not feasible. The ultimate properties of HFs are not only a reduced allergenicity but also decreased immunogenic capacity combined with good taste and caloric value. No information is available concerning the capacity of HFs to induce immune responses. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the residual immunogenic capacity of partially (pHF) and extensively hydrolyzed milk formula (eHF), and we studied the cellular reactivity of cord blood-derived (n = 71) mononuclear cells induced by 10 different HFs. METHODS: To test the effect of HF on T-helper cells, beta-casein-specific T-cell clones (TCCs, n = 21) from individuals allergic to milk were established, and T-cell proliferation and cytokine profiles (interferon-gamma and IL-4) were determined on stimulation with HF. RESULTS: We found significantly reduced proliferative responses of eHF compared with milk proteins. Whey-based pHF displayed the same proliferative capacity as unmodified milk proteins. As expected, extensively processed whey products displayed lower cellular responses compared with partially hydrolyzed products (pHF whey vs eHF whey, p < 0.0001). No difference in cellular response was found between casein-based pHF and casein-based eHF. Beta-casein-specific TCCs (n = 21) proliferated in response to casein-derived hydrolysates (14% with casein/whey-based pHF, 4% with casein-based pHF, and 0% with casein-based eHF). Whey-based pHF was also found to induce proliferation in beta-casein-specific TCCs, indicating the presence or the generation of peptides displaying cross-reactivity with these whey-derived hydrolysates. TCCs stimulated with whey- or casein-based pHF or eHF produced the same amount of cytokines (IL-4, interferon-gamma) as the same clones stimulated with unmodified products. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that whey- and casein-derived eHFs display highly reduced immunogenic properties at the T-cell level. In contrast, pHFs display residual immunogenic properties detectable at the T-cell level, reflecting a potential for the induction of pathogenetically important T-cell responses. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9564805/Cord_blood_mononuclear_cells_and_milk_specific_T_cell_clones_are_tools_to_evaluate_the_residual_immunogenicity_of_hydrolyzed_milk_formulas_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(98)70359-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -