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Plasma leptin concentrations in newborns of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers.
Am J Perinatol 1998; 15(4):243-7AJ

Abstract

Leptin plays an important role in regulating body composition through modulation of appetite and energy expenditure. We hypothesized that leptin levels in umbilical cord blood correlate with newborn body weight and habitus. We also hypothesized that infants of diabetic mothers would demonstrate altered leptin metabolism. Venous blood was sampled at birth from the umbilical cords of 105 infants (74 infants of nondiabetic mothers, and 31 infants of diabetic mothers). Thirty-nine mothers had plasma leptin concentrations measured. Analysis was done using Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation, and Spearman's correlation. Univariate/multivariate regression was used for analysis of factors associated with leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma. Maternal and newborn characteristics were correlated with log leptin levels in umbilical venous plasma. Leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma correlated best with birth weight for newborns of both nondiabetic and diabetic mothers (p < 0.01 for either). Umbilical cord plasma concentration of leptin was higher in infants of diabetic mothers than in infants of nondiabetic mothers (2.53 +/- 1.09 vs. 1.76 +/- 0.82; p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant (p < 0.01) relationship between umbilical cord leptin level and newborn birth weight, as well as maternal DM, but not with gestational age. Similarly, there was no significant correlation with maternal plasma leptin concentration. The strong correlation of leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma with newborn birth weight, and the lack of significant correlation with maternal leptin plasma levels, suggest that normal fetal leptin metabolism reflects fetal size and/or body habitus independent of maternal leptin metabolism. On the other hand, the higher umbilical plasma levels in infants of diabetic mothers may reflect an influence of altered fetal insulin homeostasis on fetal leptin metabolism, and suggests that maternal diabetes may influence fetal leptin metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9565222

Citation

Gross, G A., et al. "Plasma Leptin Concentrations in Newborns of Diabetic and Nondiabetic Mothers." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 15, no. 4, 1998, pp. 243-7.
Gross GA, Solenberger T, Philpott T, et al. Plasma leptin concentrations in newborns of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers. Am J Perinatol. 1998;15(4):243-7.
Gross, G. A., Solenberger, T., Philpott, T., Holcomb, W. L., & Landt, M. (1998). Plasma leptin concentrations in newborns of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers. American Journal of Perinatology, 15(4), pp. 243-7.
Gross GA, et al. Plasma Leptin Concentrations in Newborns of Diabetic and Nondiabetic Mothers. Am J Perinatol. 1998;15(4):243-7. PubMed PMID: 9565222.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma leptin concentrations in newborns of diabetic and nondiabetic mothers. AU - Gross,G A, AU - Solenberger,T, AU - Philpott,T, AU - Holcomb,W L,Jr AU - Landt,M, PY - 1998/6/13/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/6/13/entrez SP - 243 EP - 7 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - Leptin plays an important role in regulating body composition through modulation of appetite and energy expenditure. We hypothesized that leptin levels in umbilical cord blood correlate with newborn body weight and habitus. We also hypothesized that infants of diabetic mothers would demonstrate altered leptin metabolism. Venous blood was sampled at birth from the umbilical cords of 105 infants (74 infants of nondiabetic mothers, and 31 infants of diabetic mothers). Thirty-nine mothers had plasma leptin concentrations measured. Analysis was done using Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation, and Spearman's correlation. Univariate/multivariate regression was used for analysis of factors associated with leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma. Maternal and newborn characteristics were correlated with log leptin levels in umbilical venous plasma. Leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma correlated best with birth weight for newborns of both nondiabetic and diabetic mothers (p < 0.01 for either). Umbilical cord plasma concentration of leptin was higher in infants of diabetic mothers than in infants of nondiabetic mothers (2.53 +/- 1.09 vs. 1.76 +/- 0.82; p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant (p < 0.01) relationship between umbilical cord leptin level and newborn birth weight, as well as maternal DM, but not with gestational age. Similarly, there was no significant correlation with maternal plasma leptin concentration. The strong correlation of leptin concentration in umbilical cord plasma with newborn birth weight, and the lack of significant correlation with maternal leptin plasma levels, suggest that normal fetal leptin metabolism reflects fetal size and/or body habitus independent of maternal leptin metabolism. On the other hand, the higher umbilical plasma levels in infants of diabetic mothers may reflect an influence of altered fetal insulin homeostasis on fetal leptin metabolism, and suggests that maternal diabetes may influence fetal leptin metabolism. SN - 0735-1631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9565222/Plasma_leptin_concentrations_in_newborns_of_diabetic_and_nondiabetic_mothers_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-993935 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -