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Iron nutritional status is improved in Brazilian preterm infants fed food cooked in iron pots.
J Nutr 1998; 128(5):855-9JN

Abstract

To determine the efficacy of cooking food in iron pots to prevent anemia in premature infants, a longitudinal study on iron nutritional status was conducted in preterm, healthy infants from families of low socioeconomic level between mo 4 and 12 of life. The infants were divided randomly into two groups. The study group consisted of 22 infants whose food was cooked in iron pots; the control group consisted of 23 infants whose food was cooked in aluminum pots. Supplemental iron [2 mg/(kg.d)] was recommended from 15 d to 12 mo of age for both groups. At 12 mo of age, the group fed food cooked in iron pots had significantly better hematologic values than the group fed food cooked in aluminum pots. Differences included hemoglobin (116 +/- 16 vs. 103 +/- 20 g/L, P = 0.02), hematocrit (0.35 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.05, P = 0.005), mean corpuscular volume (72.1 +/- 10.4 vs. 62.7 +/- 11.1 fL, P = 0.005), free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (0.78 +/- 0.60 vs. 1.46 +/- 0.94 mol/L, P = 0.006) and serum ferritin (median 5 vs. 0 g/L, P = 0.001). No significant differences between groups were observed in serum iron concentration, total iron-binding capacity or transferrin saturation. Iron deficiency anemia (hemoglobin </= 110 g/L) was observed in 36.4% (8 of 22) of infants in the group fed food cooked in iron pots and in 73.9% (17 of 23) of the infants fed food cooked in aluminum pots (P = 0.03). These results indicate that the iron added to food cooked in iron pots is bioavailable. However, this increased iron availability was insufficient to satisfy the high iron requirements of this group of preterm infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hospital for Medicine of the Locomotor System-SARAH, Brasília, 70330-150, DF, Brazil.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9566993

Citation

Borigato, E V., and F E. Martinez. "Iron Nutritional Status Is Improved in Brazilian Preterm Infants Fed Food Cooked in Iron Pots." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 128, no. 5, 1998, pp. 855-9.
Borigato EV, Martinez FE. Iron nutritional status is improved in Brazilian preterm infants fed food cooked in iron pots. J Nutr. 1998;128(5):855-9.
Borigato, E. V., & Martinez, F. E. (1998). Iron nutritional status is improved in Brazilian preterm infants fed food cooked in iron pots. The Journal of Nutrition, 128(5), pp. 855-9.
Borigato EV, Martinez FE. Iron Nutritional Status Is Improved in Brazilian Preterm Infants Fed Food Cooked in Iron Pots. J Nutr. 1998;128(5):855-9. PubMed PMID: 9566993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron nutritional status is improved in Brazilian preterm infants fed food cooked in iron pots. AU - Borigato,E V, AU - Martinez,F E, PY - 1998/6/13/pubmed PY - 1998/6/13/medline PY - 1998/6/13/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Anemia--prevention and control KW - Biology KW - Brazil KW - Deficiency Diseases--prevention and control KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diet KW - Diseases KW - Health KW - Infant KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Infant, Premature KW - Iron KW - Latin America KW - Metals KW - Micronutrients KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Report KW - South America KW - Youth SP - 855 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 128 IS - 5 N2 - To determine the efficacy of cooking food in iron pots to prevent anemia in premature infants, a longitudinal study on iron nutritional status was conducted in preterm, healthy infants from families of low socioeconomic level between mo 4 and 12 of life. The infants were divided randomly into two groups. The study group consisted of 22 infants whose food was cooked in iron pots; the control group consisted of 23 infants whose food was cooked in aluminum pots. Supplemental iron [2 mg/(kg.d)] was recommended from 15 d to 12 mo of age for both groups. At 12 mo of age, the group fed food cooked in iron pots had significantly better hematologic values than the group fed food cooked in aluminum pots. Differences included hemoglobin (116 +/- 16 vs. 103 +/- 20 g/L, P = 0.02), hematocrit (0.35 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.05, P = 0.005), mean corpuscular volume (72.1 +/- 10.4 vs. 62.7 +/- 11.1 fL, P = 0.005), free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (0.78 +/- 0.60 vs. 1.46 +/- 0.94 mol/L, P = 0.006) and serum ferritin (median 5 vs. 0 g/L, P = 0.001). No significant differences between groups were observed in serum iron concentration, total iron-binding capacity or transferrin saturation. Iron deficiency anemia (hemoglobin </= 110 g/L) was observed in 36.4% (8 of 22) of infants in the group fed food cooked in iron pots and in 73.9% (17 of 23) of the infants fed food cooked in aluminum pots (P = 0.03). These results indicate that the iron added to food cooked in iron pots is bioavailable. However, this increased iron availability was insufficient to satisfy the high iron requirements of this group of preterm infants. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9566993/Iron_nutritional_status_is_improved_in_Brazilian_preterm_infants_fed_food_cooked_in_iron_pots_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/128.5.855 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -