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High-altitude medicine.
Am Fam Physician. 1998 Apr 15; 57(8):1907-14, 1924-6.AF

Abstract

As more people enjoy the outdoors, high-altitude illness is increasingly becoming a problem that family physicians across the country must treat. High-altitude illness, which usually occurs at altitudes of over 1,500 m (4,921 ft), is caused primarily by hypoxia but is compounded by cold and exposure. It presents as one of three forms: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). But high-altitude illness can have many other manifestations. Cardinal symptoms include dyspnea on exertion and at rest, cough, nausea, difficulty sleeping, headache and mental status changes. Treatment requires descent, and gradual acclimatization provides the most effective prevention. Acetazolimide is an effective preventive aid and can be used in certain conditions as treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9575328

Citation

Harris, M D., et al. "High-altitude Medicine." American Family Physician, vol. 57, no. 8, 1998, pp. 1907-14, 1924-6.
Harris MD, Terrio J, Miser WF, et al. High-altitude medicine. Am Fam Physician. 1998;57(8):1907-14, 1924-6.
Harris, M. D., Terrio, J., Miser, W. F., & Yetter, J. F. (1998). High-altitude medicine. American Family Physician, 57(8), 1907-14, 1924-6.
Harris MD, et al. High-altitude Medicine. Am Fam Physician. 1998 Apr 15;57(8):1907-14, 1924-6. PubMed PMID: 9575328.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-altitude medicine. AU - Harris,M D, AU - Terrio,J, AU - Miser,W F, AU - Yetter,J F,3rd PY - 1998/5/12/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/5/12/entrez SP - 1907-14, 1924-6 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 57 IS - 8 N2 - As more people enjoy the outdoors, high-altitude illness is increasingly becoming a problem that family physicians across the country must treat. High-altitude illness, which usually occurs at altitudes of over 1,500 m (4,921 ft), is caused primarily by hypoxia but is compounded by cold and exposure. It presents as one of three forms: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). But high-altitude illness can have many other manifestations. Cardinal symptoms include dyspnea on exertion and at rest, cough, nausea, difficulty sleeping, headache and mental status changes. Treatment requires descent, and gradual acclimatization provides the most effective prevention. Acetazolimide is an effective preventive aid and can be used in certain conditions as treatment. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9575328/High_altitude_medicine_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=9575328 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -