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The nutritional health of New Zealand vegetarian and non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: selected vitamin, mineral and lipid levels.
N Z Med J 1998; 111(1062):91-4NZ

Abstract

AIM

To determine whether adult non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists differ in selected nutrition related health aspects from adult vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists.

METHODS

One hundred and forty-one Seventh-day Adventist church members responded to a general health questionnaire. Forty-seven sex and age matched subjects (23 non-vegetarians and 24 vegetarians) were selected for further investigation. Blood lipids, serum vitamin B12, folate, haemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured along with stature, weight and blood pressure. A quantitative 7-day diet record was also completed.

RESULTS

Body mass index was similar between the non-vegetarian and vegetarian groups but diastolic blood pressure was higher for non-vegetarian than vegetarian males. Even though the dietary vitamin B12 intake was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in the vegetarian group both vegetarians and non-vegetarians recorded similar serum vitamin B12 levels. The vegetarian and non-vegetarian groups had similar haemoglobin concentrations. While dietary iron intake was higher in the female vegetarian group, though predominantly in the non-haem form, the difference was not significant. Low serum ferritin levels were found in both female dietary groups even though the vegetarian group had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher vitamin C intake. Blood lipid levels were similar in the two diet groups even though the vegetarian group had a lower percentage energy contribution from total and saturated fat (p < 0.01) and consumed significantly less cholesterol.

CONCLUSION

Both non-vegetarian and vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists appear likely to enjoy a lower risk of nutrition related chronic degenerative disease than the average New Zealander and have a satisfactory iron and vitamin B12 status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9577459

Citation

Harman, S K., and W R. Parnell. "The Nutritional Health of New Zealand Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: Selected Vitamin, Mineral and Lipid Levels." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 111, no. 1062, 1998, pp. 91-4.
Harman SK, Parnell WR. The nutritional health of New Zealand vegetarian and non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: selected vitamin, mineral and lipid levels. N Z Med J. 1998;111(1062):91-4.
Harman, S. K., & Parnell, W. R. (1998). The nutritional health of New Zealand vegetarian and non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: selected vitamin, mineral and lipid levels. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 111(1062), pp. 91-4.
Harman SK, Parnell WR. The Nutritional Health of New Zealand Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: Selected Vitamin, Mineral and Lipid Levels. N Z Med J. 1998 Mar 27;111(1062):91-4. PubMed PMID: 9577459.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The nutritional health of New Zealand vegetarian and non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists: selected vitamin, mineral and lipid levels. AU - Harman,S K, AU - Parnell,W R, PY - 1998/5/13/pubmed PY - 1998/5/13/medline PY - 1998/5/13/entrez SP - 91 EP - 4 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N. Z. Med. J. VL - 111 IS - 1062 N2 - AIM: To determine whether adult non-vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists differ in selected nutrition related health aspects from adult vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists. METHODS: One hundred and forty-one Seventh-day Adventist church members responded to a general health questionnaire. Forty-seven sex and age matched subjects (23 non-vegetarians and 24 vegetarians) were selected for further investigation. Blood lipids, serum vitamin B12, folate, haemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured along with stature, weight and blood pressure. A quantitative 7-day diet record was also completed. RESULTS: Body mass index was similar between the non-vegetarian and vegetarian groups but diastolic blood pressure was higher for non-vegetarian than vegetarian males. Even though the dietary vitamin B12 intake was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in the vegetarian group both vegetarians and non-vegetarians recorded similar serum vitamin B12 levels. The vegetarian and non-vegetarian groups had similar haemoglobin concentrations. While dietary iron intake was higher in the female vegetarian group, though predominantly in the non-haem form, the difference was not significant. Low serum ferritin levels were found in both female dietary groups even though the vegetarian group had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher vitamin C intake. Blood lipid levels were similar in the two diet groups even though the vegetarian group had a lower percentage energy contribution from total and saturated fat (p < 0.01) and consumed significantly less cholesterol. CONCLUSION: Both non-vegetarian and vegetarian Seventh-day Adventists appear likely to enjoy a lower risk of nutrition related chronic degenerative disease than the average New Zealander and have a satisfactory iron and vitamin B12 status. SN - 0028-8446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9577459/The_nutritional_health_of_New_Zealand_vegetarian_and_non_vegetarian_Seventh_day_Adventists:_selected_vitamin_mineral_and_lipid_levels_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vegetariandiet.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -