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Urolithiasis in dogs. II: Breed prevalence, and interrelations of breed, sex, age, and mineral composition.
Am J Vet Res. 1998 May; 59(5):630-42.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To analyze selected breed-related data for canine urinary calculi.

SAMPLE POPULATION

11,000 specimens: 5,781 from female dogs, 5,215 from males, and 4 from dogs of unrecorded sex.

PROCEDURE

Information was compiled for all canine urinary calculi submitted between July 1981 and January 1994. Results for a mixed-breed group and 26 of the most common breeds of stone-forming dogs were analyzed. Interrelations of breed, sex, and age of affected dogs and mineral composition of the specimens were determined.

RESULTS

Prevalence of 5 specific mineral types was significantly correlated between the sexes of 27 common breed groups: struvite, calcium phosphate (apatite), calcium oxalate, brushite, and urate. Struvite-containing calculi were seen in high proportions in both sexes of 7 breeds, and in low proportions in both sexes of 7 other breeds. Male and female Lhasa Apsos, Cairn Terriers, and 5 other breeds had high proportions of oxalate-containing calculi; values in males were substantially higher. Low numbers of oxalate-containing calculi were seen in both sexes of 7 breeds; Dalmatians had the lowest numbers. Males and females of 6 breeds had high numbers of urate-containing calculi, Dalmatians and English Bulldogs had the highest numbers. Low amounts of urate were found in calculi from males and females of 6 breeds, Samoyeds had the lowest numbers. Highest proportions of cystine-containing calculi were seen in male Dachshunds, English Bulldogs, and Chihuahuas. Males of 8 breeds had no specimens that contained cystine; only 2 such specimens were obtained from females.

CONCLUSIONS

Prevalence of uroliths differs among breed, age, and sex of affected dogs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Breed, sex, and age of dogs; mineral types of calculi in males versus females; and their anatomic location within the tract are important considerations for clinicians when evaluating risk in dogs with urolithiasis and in identifying areas that need further in-depth applied or clinical investigation, or both.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616-8737, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9582969

Citation

Ling, G V., et al. "Urolithiasis in Dogs. II: Breed Prevalence, and Interrelations of Breed, Sex, Age, and Mineral Composition." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 59, no. 5, 1998, pp. 630-42.
Ling GV, Franti CE, Ruby AL, et al. Urolithiasis in dogs. II: Breed prevalence, and interrelations of breed, sex, age, and mineral composition. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(5):630-42.
Ling, G. V., Franti, C. E., Ruby, A. L., & Johnson, D. L. (1998). Urolithiasis in dogs. II: Breed prevalence, and interrelations of breed, sex, age, and mineral composition. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 59(5), 630-42.
Ling GV, et al. Urolithiasis in Dogs. II: Breed Prevalence, and Interrelations of Breed, Sex, Age, and Mineral Composition. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(5):630-42. PubMed PMID: 9582969.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urolithiasis in dogs. II: Breed prevalence, and interrelations of breed, sex, age, and mineral composition. AU - Ling,G V, AU - Franti,C E, AU - Ruby,A L, AU - Johnson,D L, PY - 1998/5/16/pubmed PY - 1998/5/16/medline PY - 1998/5/16/entrez SP - 630 EP - 42 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 59 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To analyze selected breed-related data for canine urinary calculi. SAMPLE POPULATION: 11,000 specimens: 5,781 from female dogs, 5,215 from males, and 4 from dogs of unrecorded sex. PROCEDURE: Information was compiled for all canine urinary calculi submitted between July 1981 and January 1994. Results for a mixed-breed group and 26 of the most common breeds of stone-forming dogs were analyzed. Interrelations of breed, sex, and age of affected dogs and mineral composition of the specimens were determined. RESULTS: Prevalence of 5 specific mineral types was significantly correlated between the sexes of 27 common breed groups: struvite, calcium phosphate (apatite), calcium oxalate, brushite, and urate. Struvite-containing calculi were seen in high proportions in both sexes of 7 breeds, and in low proportions in both sexes of 7 other breeds. Male and female Lhasa Apsos, Cairn Terriers, and 5 other breeds had high proportions of oxalate-containing calculi; values in males were substantially higher. Low numbers of oxalate-containing calculi were seen in both sexes of 7 breeds; Dalmatians had the lowest numbers. Males and females of 6 breeds had high numbers of urate-containing calculi, Dalmatians and English Bulldogs had the highest numbers. Low amounts of urate were found in calculi from males and females of 6 breeds, Samoyeds had the lowest numbers. Highest proportions of cystine-containing calculi were seen in male Dachshunds, English Bulldogs, and Chihuahuas. Males of 8 breeds had no specimens that contained cystine; only 2 such specimens were obtained from females. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of uroliths differs among breed, age, and sex of affected dogs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Breed, sex, and age of dogs; mineral types of calculi in males versus females; and their anatomic location within the tract are important considerations for clinicians when evaluating risk in dogs with urolithiasis and in identifying areas that need further in-depth applied or clinical investigation, or both. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9582969/Urolithiasis_in_dogs__II:_Breed_prevalence_and_interrelations_of_breed_sex_age_and_mineral_composition_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/minerals.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -