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Urolithiasis in dogs. IV: Survey of interrelations among breed, mineral composition, and anatomic location of calculi, and presence of urinary tract infection.
Am J Vet Res. 1998 May; 59(5):650-60.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compile and analyze selected data from a large number of canine urinary calculus specimens that were subjected to quantitative, layer-by-layer mineral analysis.

SAMPLE POPULATION

11,000 canine urinary calculus specimens: 5,781 from female dogs, 5,215 from male dogs, and 4 from dogs of unrecorded sex.

PROCEDURE

Records of the Urinary Stone Analysis Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California were used to compile information regarding urinary calculus specimens from dogs. Records surveyed were of all canine calculi submitted for analysis between July 1981 and January 1994. Results analyzed included those of a mixed-breed group and 26 common breeds of stone-forming dogs. Interrelations of breed, sex, and age of the affected dogs, mineral composition of the specimens, and associated urinary tract infections were analyzed statistically.

RESULTS

Proportions of culture-positive specimens were significantly correlated between the sexes (r = 0.494, P = 0.008). Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated most often from either sex, ranging from 36.1% (Basset Hounds) to 67.9% (Pekingese) of cultured specimens from females and 8.7% (Chihuahuas) to 71.4% (Scottish Terriers) of specimens from males. The second most frequently isolated bacterial species, Escherichia coli, ranged from 0% in males of 2 breeds and females of 4 breeds to 25% in Cairn Terrier males and 19.4% in Basset Hound females. Streptococcus spp were the third most frequently isolated bacterial species. Significant correlations between the sexes were found for percentages of calculi located in the urinary bladder (r = 0.490, P = 0.008), and for calculi voided in the urine (r = 0.503, P = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

Breed and sex differences in prevalence of urolithiasis- and mineral-associated bacterial infections are numerous. Staphylococcus intermedius was the most common isolate from specimens from all but 3 of 54 breed/sex groupings. For either sex, streptococcal infections were significantly related to proportions of calculi passed in the urine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9582971

Citation

Ling, G V., et al. "Urolithiasis in Dogs. IV: Survey of Interrelations Among Breed, Mineral Composition, and Anatomic Location of Calculi, and Presence of Urinary Tract Infection." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 59, no. 5, 1998, pp. 650-60.
Ling GV, Franti CE, Johnson DL, et al. Urolithiasis in dogs. IV: Survey of interrelations among breed, mineral composition, and anatomic location of calculi, and presence of urinary tract infection. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(5):650-60.
Ling, G. V., Franti, C. E., Johnson, D. L., & Ruby, A. L. (1998). Urolithiasis in dogs. IV: Survey of interrelations among breed, mineral composition, and anatomic location of calculi, and presence of urinary tract infection. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 59(5), 650-60.
Ling GV, et al. Urolithiasis in Dogs. IV: Survey of Interrelations Among Breed, Mineral Composition, and Anatomic Location of Calculi, and Presence of Urinary Tract Infection. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(5):650-60. PubMed PMID: 9582971.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urolithiasis in dogs. IV: Survey of interrelations among breed, mineral composition, and anatomic location of calculi, and presence of urinary tract infection. AU - Ling,G V, AU - Franti,C E, AU - Johnson,D L, AU - Ruby,A L, PY - 1998/5/16/pubmed PY - 1998/5/16/medline PY - 1998/5/16/entrez SP - 650 EP - 60 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 59 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compile and analyze selected data from a large number of canine urinary calculus specimens that were subjected to quantitative, layer-by-layer mineral analysis. SAMPLE POPULATION: 11,000 canine urinary calculus specimens: 5,781 from female dogs, 5,215 from male dogs, and 4 from dogs of unrecorded sex. PROCEDURE: Records of the Urinary Stone Analysis Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California were used to compile information regarding urinary calculus specimens from dogs. Records surveyed were of all canine calculi submitted for analysis between July 1981 and January 1994. Results analyzed included those of a mixed-breed group and 26 common breeds of stone-forming dogs. Interrelations of breed, sex, and age of the affected dogs, mineral composition of the specimens, and associated urinary tract infections were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Proportions of culture-positive specimens were significantly correlated between the sexes (r = 0.494, P = 0.008). Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated most often from either sex, ranging from 36.1% (Basset Hounds) to 67.9% (Pekingese) of cultured specimens from females and 8.7% (Chihuahuas) to 71.4% (Scottish Terriers) of specimens from males. The second most frequently isolated bacterial species, Escherichia coli, ranged from 0% in males of 2 breeds and females of 4 breeds to 25% in Cairn Terrier males and 19.4% in Basset Hound females. Streptococcus spp were the third most frequently isolated bacterial species. Significant correlations between the sexes were found for percentages of calculi located in the urinary bladder (r = 0.490, P = 0.008), and for calculi voided in the urine (r = 0.503, P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Breed and sex differences in prevalence of urolithiasis- and mineral-associated bacterial infections are numerous. Staphylococcus intermedius was the most common isolate from specimens from all but 3 of 54 breed/sex groupings. For either sex, streptococcal infections were significantly related to proportions of calculi passed in the urine. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9582971/Urolithiasis_in_dogs__IV:_Survey_of_interrelations_among_breed_mineral_composition_and_anatomic_location_of_calculi_and_presence_of_urinary_tract_infection_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/urinarytractinfections.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -