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Sarthran preserves cochlear microcirculation and reduces temporary threshold shifts after noise exposure.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998 May; 118(5):576-83.OH

Abstract

The cause of noise-induced hearing loss remains unclear despite years of both epidemiologic and experimental investigation. Among the many possible pathophysiologic mechanisms that may contribute to noise-induced temporary or permanent threshold shifts are insufficiencies in cochlear blood flow. Although the literature is inconsistent, several histologic and physiologic studies demonstrate signs of reduced circulation in the cochlea after noise exposure. Recent studies using computer-enhanced intravital microscopy complement these earlier findings. Evidence suggests that these microcirculatory events are mediated in part by several circulating factors, including the potent vasoactive peptide angiotensin. This study investigated this possibility by pretreating with the angiotensin receptor antagonist sarthran during noise exposure and examining both cochlear microcirculation and auditory sensitivity. The results of these experiments show noise-induced ischemia in the lateral wall of the cochlea and temporary threshold shifts. Treatment with sarthran prevented this noise-induced microcirculatory ischemia and preserved auditory sensitivity at the low frequencies tested. These findings support a role for the angiotensinergic system during noise exposure and suggest that preservation of cochlear blood flow is functionally related to auditory sensitivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9591853

Citation

Goldwin, B, et al. "Sarthran Preserves Cochlear Microcirculation and Reduces Temporary Threshold Shifts After Noise Exposure." Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 118, no. 5, 1998, pp. 576-83.
Goldwin B, Khan MJ, Shivapuja B, et al. Sarthran preserves cochlear microcirculation and reduces temporary threshold shifts after noise exposure. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998;118(5):576-83.
Goldwin, B., Khan, M. J., Shivapuja, B., Seidman, M. D., & Quirk, W. S. (1998). Sarthran preserves cochlear microcirculation and reduces temporary threshold shifts after noise exposure. Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 118(5), 576-83.
Goldwin B, et al. Sarthran Preserves Cochlear Microcirculation and Reduces Temporary Threshold Shifts After Noise Exposure. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998;118(5):576-83. PubMed PMID: 9591853.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sarthran preserves cochlear microcirculation and reduces temporary threshold shifts after noise exposure. AU - Goldwin,B, AU - Khan,M J, AU - Shivapuja,B, AU - Seidman,M D, AU - Quirk,W S, PY - 1998/5/20/pubmed PY - 1998/5/20/medline PY - 1998/5/20/entrez SP - 576 EP - 83 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 118 IS - 5 N2 - The cause of noise-induced hearing loss remains unclear despite years of both epidemiologic and experimental investigation. Among the many possible pathophysiologic mechanisms that may contribute to noise-induced temporary or permanent threshold shifts are insufficiencies in cochlear blood flow. Although the literature is inconsistent, several histologic and physiologic studies demonstrate signs of reduced circulation in the cochlea after noise exposure. Recent studies using computer-enhanced intravital microscopy complement these earlier findings. Evidence suggests that these microcirculatory events are mediated in part by several circulating factors, including the potent vasoactive peptide angiotensin. This study investigated this possibility by pretreating with the angiotensin receptor antagonist sarthran during noise exposure and examining both cochlear microcirculation and auditory sensitivity. The results of these experiments show noise-induced ischemia in the lateral wall of the cochlea and temporary threshold shifts. Treatment with sarthran prevented this noise-induced microcirculatory ischemia and preserved auditory sensitivity at the low frequencies tested. These findings support a role for the angiotensinergic system during noise exposure and suggest that preservation of cochlear blood flow is functionally related to auditory sensitivity. SN - 0194-5998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9591853/Sarthran_preserves_cochlear_microcirculation_and_reduces_temporary_threshold_shifts_after_noise_exposure_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/019459989811800503?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -