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Relation of traditional risk factors to intrauterine growth retardation among United States-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago.
Ethn Dis 1998; 8(1):21-5ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the relation of traditional sociodemographic characteristics to the small-for-gestational age rates of urban Mexican Americans.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study.

METHODS

We performed a stratified analysis of 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data. The authors analyzed the 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data to determine whether maternal sociodemographic characteristics are associated with the small-for-gestational age (weight-for-gestational-length < 10th percentile) rates among Mexican Americans in Chicago.

RESULTS

The small-for-gestational age rate was 2.1% for infants with U.S.-born mothers (N = 2,253) compared to 1.4% for infants with foreign-born mothers (N = 8,746); relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.1). For the U.S.-born cohort, maternal education, marital status, parity, prenatal care, and community income were associated with small-for-gestational age rates. In contrast, with the exception of marital status, these commonly cited risk factors were not associated with the small-for-gestational age rates of infants with Mexican-born mothers. The U.S.-born:Mexico-born small-for-gestational age rate ratio fluctuated around 2 among mothers with a high-risk (maternal age < 20 years, < 12 years education, unmarried marital status) demographic profile.

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that traditional sociodemographic risk factors have different reproductive outcome consequences for U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexican-American mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital/Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9595244

Citation

Collins, J W., and C R. Martin. "Relation of Traditional Risk Factors to Intrauterine Growth Retardation Among United States-born and Foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 8, no. 1, 1998, pp. 21-5.
Collins JW, Martin CR. Relation of traditional risk factors to intrauterine growth retardation among United States-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago. Ethn Dis. 1998;8(1):21-5.
Collins, J. W., & Martin, C. R. (1998). Relation of traditional risk factors to intrauterine growth retardation among United States-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago. Ethnicity & Disease, 8(1), pp. 21-5.
Collins JW, Martin CR. Relation of Traditional Risk Factors to Intrauterine Growth Retardation Among United States-born and Foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago. Ethn Dis. 1998;8(1):21-5. PubMed PMID: 9595244.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relation of traditional risk factors to intrauterine growth retardation among United States-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago. AU - Collins,J W,Jr AU - Martin,C R, PY - 1998/5/22/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/5/22/entrez SP - 21 EP - 5 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the relation of traditional sociodemographic characteristics to the small-for-gestational age rates of urban Mexican Americans. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: We performed a stratified analysis of 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data. The authors analyzed the 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data to determine whether maternal sociodemographic characteristics are associated with the small-for-gestational age (weight-for-gestational-length < 10th percentile) rates among Mexican Americans in Chicago. RESULTS: The small-for-gestational age rate was 2.1% for infants with U.S.-born mothers (N = 2,253) compared to 1.4% for infants with foreign-born mothers (N = 8,746); relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.1). For the U.S.-born cohort, maternal education, marital status, parity, prenatal care, and community income were associated with small-for-gestational age rates. In contrast, with the exception of marital status, these commonly cited risk factors were not associated with the small-for-gestational age rates of infants with Mexican-born mothers. The U.S.-born:Mexico-born small-for-gestational age rate ratio fluctuated around 2 among mothers with a high-risk (maternal age < 20 years, < 12 years education, unmarried marital status) demographic profile. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that traditional sociodemographic risk factors have different reproductive outcome consequences for U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexican-American mothers. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9595244/Relation_of_traditional_risk_factors_to_intrauterine_growth_retardation_among_United_States_born_and_foreign_born_Mexican_Americans_in_Chicago_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -