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Breastfeeding experience and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women.

Abstract

Results of studies of breastfeeding and postmenopausal breast cancer risk have been inconsistent, with many investigators concluding that breastfeeding does not influence risk. We examined whether breastfeeding reduces postmenopausal breast cancer risk as well as the details of this relationship, including possible modification in risk by the age that a woman first breastfed a child and the number of children she breastfed. This population-based case-control study compared 974 women who were residents of Los Angeles County and newly diagnosed with breast cancer to 973 women with no history of breast cancer who were matched to patients by age (within 3 years) and neighborhood of residence. Subjects were parous and postmenopausal. Breast cancer patients were ages 55-64 years at diagnosis. Women who breastfed at least 16 months experienced a reduced odds of breast cancer relative to women who never breastfed (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.01). Risk decreased as the number of children breastfed increased, but the association was attenuated after accounting for lifetime duration of breastfeeding. Breast cancer risk was 30% lower among women ages 20-24 years at first breastfeeding than women who had never breastfed (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.88), independent of the effect of age at first birth. This study provides some evidence that the protective effect of breastfeeding persists into the postmenopausal years. The potential for nondifferential error in recall of breastfeeding habits among postmenopausal patients and controls may explain the inconsistent results observed across studies and underscores the need for careful assessment of this relationship.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Research and Evaluation Department, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, Southern California, Pasadena 91188, USA.

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    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Breast Feeding
    Breast Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Los Angeles
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Postmenopause
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9610784

    Citation

    Enger, S M., et al. "Breastfeeding Experience and Breast Cancer Risk Among Postmenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 7, no. 5, 1998, pp. 365-9.
    Enger SM, Ross RK, Paganini-Hill A, et al. Breastfeeding experience and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998;7(5):365-9.
    Enger, S. M., Ross, R. K., Paganini-Hill, A., & Bernstein, L. (1998). Breastfeeding experience and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 7(5), pp. 365-9.
    Enger SM, et al. Breastfeeding Experience and Breast Cancer Risk Among Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998;7(5):365-9. PubMed PMID: 9610784.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Breastfeeding experience and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. AU - Enger,S M, AU - Ross,R K, AU - Paganini-Hill,A, AU - Bernstein,L, PY - 1998/6/4/pubmed PY - 1998/6/4/medline PY - 1998/6/4/entrez SP - 365 EP - 9 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - Results of studies of breastfeeding and postmenopausal breast cancer risk have been inconsistent, with many investigators concluding that breastfeeding does not influence risk. We examined whether breastfeeding reduces postmenopausal breast cancer risk as well as the details of this relationship, including possible modification in risk by the age that a woman first breastfed a child and the number of children she breastfed. This population-based case-control study compared 974 women who were residents of Los Angeles County and newly diagnosed with breast cancer to 973 women with no history of breast cancer who were matched to patients by age (within 3 years) and neighborhood of residence. Subjects were parous and postmenopausal. Breast cancer patients were ages 55-64 years at diagnosis. Women who breastfed at least 16 months experienced a reduced odds of breast cancer relative to women who never breastfed (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.01). Risk decreased as the number of children breastfed increased, but the association was attenuated after accounting for lifetime duration of breastfeeding. Breast cancer risk was 30% lower among women ages 20-24 years at first breastfeeding than women who had never breastfed (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.88), independent of the effect of age at first birth. This study provides some evidence that the protective effect of breastfeeding persists into the postmenopausal years. The potential for nondifferential error in recall of breastfeeding habits among postmenopausal patients and controls may explain the inconsistent results observed across studies and underscores the need for careful assessment of this relationship. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9610784/Breastfeeding_experience_and_breast_cancer_risk_among_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=9610784 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -