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Allaying fears and fallacies about lactose intolerance.
J Am Diet Assoc 1998; 98(6):671-6JA

Abstract

Public awareness and misunderstandings of lactose intolerance are at an all-time high. Many people erroneously believe they are lactose intolerant or develop gastrointestinal symptoms after intake of lactose. Consequently, lactose-containing foods such as milk and other dairy foods may be eliminated unnecessarily from the diet. Because these foods are a major source of calcium, low intake of them can compromise calcium nutriture. This, in turn, can increase the risk of major chronic diseases such as osteoporosis (porous bones) and hypertension. This review is intended to help dietetics professionals alleviate clients' fears about lactose intolerance and recommend dietary strategies to improve tolerance to lactose. Scientific findings indicate that the prevalence of lactose intolerance is grossly overestimated. Other physiologic and psychologic factors can contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms that mimic lactose intolerance. Scientific findings also indicate that people with laboratory-confirmed low levels of the enzyme lactase can consume 1 serving of milk with a meal or 2 servings of milk per day in divided doses at breakfast and dinner without experiencing symptoms. Several dietary strategies are available to help lactose maldigesters include milk and other dairy foods in their diet without experiencing symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Dairy Council, Rosemont, Ill., USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9627625

Citation

McBean, L D., and G D. Miller. "Allaying Fears and Fallacies About Lactose Intolerance." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 98, no. 6, 1998, pp. 671-6.
McBean LD, Miller GD. Allaying fears and fallacies about lactose intolerance. J Am Diet Assoc. 1998;98(6):671-6.
McBean, L. D., & Miller, G. D. (1998). Allaying fears and fallacies about lactose intolerance. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 98(6), pp. 671-6.
McBean LD, Miller GD. Allaying Fears and Fallacies About Lactose Intolerance. J Am Diet Assoc. 1998;98(6):671-6. PubMed PMID: 9627625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allaying fears and fallacies about lactose intolerance. AU - McBean,L D, AU - Miller,G D, PY - 1998/6/17/pubmed PY - 1998/6/17/medline PY - 1998/6/17/entrez SP - 671 EP - 6 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 98 IS - 6 N2 - Public awareness and misunderstandings of lactose intolerance are at an all-time high. Many people erroneously believe they are lactose intolerant or develop gastrointestinal symptoms after intake of lactose. Consequently, lactose-containing foods such as milk and other dairy foods may be eliminated unnecessarily from the diet. Because these foods are a major source of calcium, low intake of them can compromise calcium nutriture. This, in turn, can increase the risk of major chronic diseases such as osteoporosis (porous bones) and hypertension. This review is intended to help dietetics professionals alleviate clients' fears about lactose intolerance and recommend dietary strategies to improve tolerance to lactose. Scientific findings indicate that the prevalence of lactose intolerance is grossly overestimated. Other physiologic and psychologic factors can contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms that mimic lactose intolerance. Scientific findings also indicate that people with laboratory-confirmed low levels of the enzyme lactase can consume 1 serving of milk with a meal or 2 servings of milk per day in divided doses at breakfast and dinner without experiencing symptoms. Several dietary strategies are available to help lactose maldigesters include milk and other dairy foods in their diet without experiencing symptoms. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9627625/Allaying_fears_and_fallacies_about_lactose_intolerance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(98)00152-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -