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The relationship between food refusal and self-injurious behavior: a case study.
J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry 1998; 29(1):67-77JB

Abstract

Food refusal and self-injurious behavior often co-occur in children with developmental disabilities and mental retardation. The subject of the case study was a 3-yr-old boy with food refusal, self-injurious behavior and developmental delay. Using an alternating treatment design, positive reinforcement for acceptance combined with either nonremoval of the spoon or guidance for refusal increased food acceptance and resulted in a decrease in self-injurious behavior despite not being targeted. Although the contingencies for acceptance, refusal and self-injurious behavior remained constant, self-injurious behavior increased with an increase in grams consumed. A combined treatment of positive reinforcement for acceptance, guidance for refusal, position change and gastrojejunal feedings resulted in a decrease in self-injurious behavior and an increase in grams consumed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA. kerwin@rowan.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9627826

Citation

Kerwin, M L., et al. "The Relationship Between Food Refusal and Self-injurious Behavior: a Case Study." Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, vol. 29, no. 1, 1998, pp. 67-77.
Kerwin ML, Ahearn WH, Eicher PS, et al. The relationship between food refusal and self-injurious behavior: a case study. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 1998;29(1):67-77.
Kerwin, M. L., Ahearn, W. H., Eicher, P. S., & Swearingin, W. (1998). The relationship between food refusal and self-injurious behavior: a case study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 29(1), pp. 67-77.
Kerwin ML, et al. The Relationship Between Food Refusal and Self-injurious Behavior: a Case Study. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 1998;29(1):67-77. PubMed PMID: 9627826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between food refusal and self-injurious behavior: a case study. AU - Kerwin,M L, AU - Ahearn,W H, AU - Eicher,P S, AU - Swearingin,W, PY - 1998/6/17/pubmed PY - 1998/6/17/medline PY - 1998/6/17/entrez SP - 67 EP - 77 JF - Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry JO - J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - Food refusal and self-injurious behavior often co-occur in children with developmental disabilities and mental retardation. The subject of the case study was a 3-yr-old boy with food refusal, self-injurious behavior and developmental delay. Using an alternating treatment design, positive reinforcement for acceptance combined with either nonremoval of the spoon or guidance for refusal increased food acceptance and resulted in a decrease in self-injurious behavior despite not being targeted. Although the contingencies for acceptance, refusal and self-injurious behavior remained constant, self-injurious behavior increased with an increase in grams consumed. A combined treatment of positive reinforcement for acceptance, guidance for refusal, position change and gastrojejunal feedings resulted in a decrease in self-injurious behavior and an increase in grams consumed. SN - 0005-7916 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9627826/The_relationship_between_food_refusal_and_self_injurious_behavior:_a_case_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005791697000402 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -