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Unraveling the mystery of cognitive changes in old age: correlation of neuropsychological evaluation with neuropathological findings in the extreme old.
Int Psychogeriatr 1998; 10(1):25-41IP

Abstract

In order to understand what cognitive changes can be expected with aging versus those caused by disease, the New England Centenarian Study examined correlations between neuropsychological evaluation and neuropathological studies of centenarian subjects. Sixty-nine subjects were administered an extensive neuropsychological test battery designed for centenarians. Six brain donors from this group have subsequently died, and neuropathological studies of their brains have been performed to determine the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathological states. Of these six centenarians, three subjects had Clinical Dementia Rating scores of 0 and no dementia on neuropsychological testing, and subsequent neuropathology showed very limited AD changes. In fact, despite a range of neuropsychological findings, none of the subjects in this series met neuropathological criteria for a diagnosis of definite AD. Findings suggest that dementia is not inevitable with aging and that dementia in this age group is surprisingly often not attributable to AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Division on Aging, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. msilver@warren.med.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9629522

Citation

Silver, M, et al. "Unraveling the Mystery of Cognitive Changes in Old Age: Correlation of Neuropsychological Evaluation With Neuropathological Findings in the Extreme Old." International Psychogeriatrics, vol. 10, no. 1, 1998, pp. 25-41.
Silver M, Newell K, Hyman B, et al. Unraveling the mystery of cognitive changes in old age: correlation of neuropsychological evaluation with neuropathological findings in the extreme old. Int Psychogeriatr. 1998;10(1):25-41.
Silver, M., Newell, K., Hyman, B., Growdon, J., Hedley-Whyte, E. T., & Perls, T. (1998). Unraveling the mystery of cognitive changes in old age: correlation of neuropsychological evaluation with neuropathological findings in the extreme old. International Psychogeriatrics, 10(1), pp. 25-41.
Silver M, et al. Unraveling the Mystery of Cognitive Changes in Old Age: Correlation of Neuropsychological Evaluation With Neuropathological Findings in the Extreme Old. Int Psychogeriatr. 1998;10(1):25-41. PubMed PMID: 9629522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unraveling the mystery of cognitive changes in old age: correlation of neuropsychological evaluation with neuropathological findings in the extreme old. AU - Silver,M, AU - Newell,K, AU - Hyman,B, AU - Growdon,J, AU - Hedley-Whyte,E T, AU - Perls,T, PY - 1998/6/18/pubmed PY - 1998/6/18/medline PY - 1998/6/18/entrez SP - 25 EP - 41 JF - International psychogeriatrics JO - Int Psychogeriatr VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - In order to understand what cognitive changes can be expected with aging versus those caused by disease, the New England Centenarian Study examined correlations between neuropsychological evaluation and neuropathological studies of centenarian subjects. Sixty-nine subjects were administered an extensive neuropsychological test battery designed for centenarians. Six brain donors from this group have subsequently died, and neuropathological studies of their brains have been performed to determine the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathological states. Of these six centenarians, three subjects had Clinical Dementia Rating scores of 0 and no dementia on neuropsychological testing, and subsequent neuropathology showed very limited AD changes. In fact, despite a range of neuropsychological findings, none of the subjects in this series met neuropathological criteria for a diagnosis of definite AD. Findings suggest that dementia is not inevitable with aging and that dementia in this age group is surprisingly often not attributable to AD. SN - 1041-6102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9629522/Unraveling_the_mystery_of_cognitive_changes_in_old_age:_correlation_of_neuropsychological_evaluation_with_neuropathological_findings_in_the_extreme_old_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dementia.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -