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Oral contraception and other factors in relation to hospital referral for fracture. Findings in a large cohort study.
Contraception. 1998 Apr; 57(4):231-5.C

Abstract

There is good evidence that estrogens and progestogens have an important effect on bone metabolism. This article explores the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use and fractures occurring at various sites among the 17,032 participants in the Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study, which now includes information accumulated during 310,000 woman-years of observation between 1968 and 1994. In total, 1308 women suffered at least one fracture during the follow-up period, which was largely confined to premenopausal years. When all fractures were combined, there was a modest, but highly significant trend (p < 0.001) of increasing risk with total duration of oral contraceptive use. In addition, there was statistically significant heterogeneity (p < 0.01) when overall fracture rates were examined in relation to recency of oral contraceptive use during the premenopausal lifespan. The highest relative risk (1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5) was for current or recent oral contraceptive users; however, viewed as a whole, no clear pattern of risk was apparent. Examination of the data for individual fracture sites (including the lower end of the radius/ulna) did not provide any evidence of a protective effect of oral contraceptive use. These results are closely similar to those reported from the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study in 1993.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Institute of Health Sciences, Oxford, England.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9649913

Citation

Vessey, M, et al. "Oral Contraception and Other Factors in Relation to Hospital Referral for Fracture. Findings in a Large Cohort Study." Contraception, vol. 57, no. 4, 1998, pp. 231-5.
Vessey M, Mant J, Painter R. Oral contraception and other factors in relation to hospital referral for fracture. Findings in a large cohort study. Contraception. 1998;57(4):231-5.
Vessey, M., Mant, J., & Painter, R. (1998). Oral contraception and other factors in relation to hospital referral for fracture. Findings in a large cohort study. Contraception, 57(4), 231-5.
Vessey M, Mant J, Painter R. Oral Contraception and Other Factors in Relation to Hospital Referral for Fracture. Findings in a Large Cohort Study. Contraception. 1998;57(4):231-5. PubMed PMID: 9649913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral contraception and other factors in relation to hospital referral for fracture. Findings in a large cohort study. AU - Vessey,M, AU - Mant,J, AU - Painter,R, PY - 1998/7/3/pubmed PY - 1998/7/3/medline PY - 1998/7/3/entrez KW - Biology KW - Cohort Analysis KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - England KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Longitudinal Studies KW - Longterm Effects KW - Northern Europe KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Scotland KW - Skeletal Effects KW - Studies KW - Time Factors KW - United Kingdom SP - 231 EP - 5 JF - Contraception JO - Contraception VL - 57 IS - 4 N2 - There is good evidence that estrogens and progestogens have an important effect on bone metabolism. This article explores the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use and fractures occurring at various sites among the 17,032 participants in the Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study, which now includes information accumulated during 310,000 woman-years of observation between 1968 and 1994. In total, 1308 women suffered at least one fracture during the follow-up period, which was largely confined to premenopausal years. When all fractures were combined, there was a modest, but highly significant trend (p < 0.001) of increasing risk with total duration of oral contraceptive use. In addition, there was statistically significant heterogeneity (p < 0.01) when overall fracture rates were examined in relation to recency of oral contraceptive use during the premenopausal lifespan. The highest relative risk (1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5) was for current or recent oral contraceptive users; however, viewed as a whole, no clear pattern of risk was apparent. Examination of the data for individual fracture sites (including the lower end of the radius/ulna) did not provide any evidence of a protective effect of oral contraceptive use. These results are closely similar to those reported from the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study in 1993. SN - 0010-7824 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9649913/Oral_contraception_and_other_factors_in_relation_to_hospital_referral_for_fracture__Findings_in_a_large_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-7824(98)00026-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -