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Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolaemia: relationship to the location of atherosclerotic disease, smoking, and in the prediction of adverse events.
Thromb Haemost. 1998 Jun; 79(6):1080-5.TH

Abstract

We examined the relationship of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with smoking and hypercholesterolaemia in peripheral artery disease (PAD). Serum samples were obtained from 119 patients with objectively-proven PAD, 39 patients with hypercholesterolaemia but asymptomatic for PAD, and 132 age and sex matched asymptomatic controls. Using ELISAs, we found increased sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 (both p <0.01) in the patients with PAD relative to the controls, but no significant change in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. However, the effect for sVCAM-1 was lost when smoking was entered as a covariate. Only sICAM-1 was higher in patients with PAD in the femoral/iliac arteries compared to the carotid arteries (p <0.05). In a 39-month follow-up of 112 patients with PAD, increased ICAM-1 weakly (univariate p <0.05) predicted those 57 whose disease progressed (i.e. to end points such as myocardial infarction and arterial surgery). However, high fibrinogen was a much better (univariate p = 0.001, multivariate p <0.05) predictor of disease progression. We suggest (i) that increased levels of sVCAM-1 in atherosclerosis are due to smoking, (ii) that increased sICAM-1 is independent of this risk factor, (iii) that both these changes are independent of hypercholesterolaemia, and (iv) that increased sICAM-1 is a weak predictor of disease progression in peripheral atherosclerosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Haemostasis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Unit, University Department of Medicine, The City Hospital, Birmingham, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9657427

Citation

Blann, A D., et al. "Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in Peripheral Artery Disease and Hypercholesterolaemia: Relationship to the Location of Atherosclerotic Disease, Smoking, and in the Prediction of Adverse Events." Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol. 79, no. 6, 1998, pp. 1080-5.
Blann AD, Seigneur M, Steiner M, et al. Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolaemia: relationship to the location of atherosclerotic disease, smoking, and in the prediction of adverse events. Thromb Haemost. 1998;79(6):1080-5.
Blann, A. D., Seigneur, M., Steiner, M., Miller, J. P., & McCollum, C. N. (1998). Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolaemia: relationship to the location of atherosclerotic disease, smoking, and in the prediction of adverse events. Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 79(6), 1080-5.
Blann AD, et al. Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in Peripheral Artery Disease and Hypercholesterolaemia: Relationship to the Location of Atherosclerotic Disease, Smoking, and in the Prediction of Adverse Events. Thromb Haemost. 1998;79(6):1080-5. PubMed PMID: 9657427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolaemia: relationship to the location of atherosclerotic disease, smoking, and in the prediction of adverse events. AU - Blann,A D, AU - Seigneur,M, AU - Steiner,M, AU - Miller,J P, AU - McCollum,C N, PY - 1998/7/10/pubmed PY - 1998/7/10/medline PY - 1998/7/10/entrez SP - 1080 EP - 5 JF - Thrombosis and haemostasis JO - Thromb. Haemost. VL - 79 IS - 6 N2 - We examined the relationship of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with smoking and hypercholesterolaemia in peripheral artery disease (PAD). Serum samples were obtained from 119 patients with objectively-proven PAD, 39 patients with hypercholesterolaemia but asymptomatic for PAD, and 132 age and sex matched asymptomatic controls. Using ELISAs, we found increased sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 (both p <0.01) in the patients with PAD relative to the controls, but no significant change in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. However, the effect for sVCAM-1 was lost when smoking was entered as a covariate. Only sICAM-1 was higher in patients with PAD in the femoral/iliac arteries compared to the carotid arteries (p <0.05). In a 39-month follow-up of 112 patients with PAD, increased ICAM-1 weakly (univariate p <0.05) predicted those 57 whose disease progressed (i.e. to end points such as myocardial infarction and arterial surgery). However, high fibrinogen was a much better (univariate p = 0.001, multivariate p <0.05) predictor of disease progression. We suggest (i) that increased levels of sVCAM-1 in atherosclerosis are due to smoking, (ii) that increased sICAM-1 is independent of this risk factor, (iii) that both these changes are independent of hypercholesterolaemia, and (iv) that increased sICAM-1 is a weak predictor of disease progression in peripheral atherosclerosis. SN - 0340-6245 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9657427/Circulating_ICAM_1_and_VCAM_1_in_peripheral_artery_disease_and_hypercholesterolaemia:_relationship_to_the_location_of_atherosclerotic_disease_smoking_and_in_the_prediction_of_adverse_events_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterollevelswhatyouneedtoknow.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -