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Dietary intake of antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function: the MORGEN study.
Thorax 1998; 53(3):166-71T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A study was undertaken to investigate the relationships between the intake of the antioxidant (pro)-vitamins C, E and beta-carotene and the presence of respiratory symptoms and lung function.

METHODS

Complete data were collected in a cross sectional study in a random sample of the Dutch population on 6555 adults during 1994 and 1995. Antioxidant intake was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and respiratory symptoms (cough, phlegm, productive cough, wheeze, shortness of breath) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Prevalence odds ratios for symptoms were calculated using logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). The results are presented as a comparison between the 90th and 10th percentiles of antioxidant intake.

RESULTS

Vitamin C intake was not associated with most symptoms but was inversely related with cough. Subjects with a high intake of vitamin C had a 53 ml (95% CI 23 to 83) higher FEV1 and 79 ml (95% CI 42 to 116) higher FVC than those with a low vitamin C intake. Vitamin E intake showed no association with most symptoms and lung function, but had a positive association with productive cough. The intake of beta-carotene was not associated with most symptoms but had a positive association with wheeze. However, subjects with a high intake of beta-carotene had a 60 ml (95% CI 31 to 89) higher FEV1 and 75 ml (95% CI 40 to 110) higher FVC than those with a low intake of beta-carotene.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study suggest that a high intake of vitamin C or beta-carotene is protective for FEV1 and FVC compared with a low intake, but not for respiratory symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chronic Diseases and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9659349

Citation

Grievink, L, et al. "Dietary Intake of Antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Function: the MORGEN Study." Thorax, vol. 53, no. 3, 1998, pp. 166-71.
Grievink L, Smit HA, Ocké MC, et al. Dietary intake of antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function: the MORGEN study. Thorax. 1998;53(3):166-71.
Grievink, L., Smit, H. A., Ocké, M. C., van 't Veer, P., & Kromhout, D. (1998). Dietary intake of antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function: the MORGEN study. Thorax, 53(3), pp. 166-71.
Grievink L, et al. Dietary Intake of Antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Function: the MORGEN Study. Thorax. 1998;53(3):166-71. PubMed PMID: 9659349.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of antioxidant (pro)-vitamins, respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function: the MORGEN study. AU - Grievink,L, AU - Smit,H A, AU - Ocké,M C, AU - van 't Veer,P, AU - Kromhout,D, PY - 1998/7/11/pubmed PY - 1998/7/11/medline PY - 1998/7/11/entrez SP - 166 EP - 71 JF - Thorax JO - Thorax VL - 53 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: A study was undertaken to investigate the relationships between the intake of the antioxidant (pro)-vitamins C, E and beta-carotene and the presence of respiratory symptoms and lung function. METHODS: Complete data were collected in a cross sectional study in a random sample of the Dutch population on 6555 adults during 1994 and 1995. Antioxidant intake was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and respiratory symptoms (cough, phlegm, productive cough, wheeze, shortness of breath) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Prevalence odds ratios for symptoms were calculated using logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). The results are presented as a comparison between the 90th and 10th percentiles of antioxidant intake. RESULTS: Vitamin C intake was not associated with most symptoms but was inversely related with cough. Subjects with a high intake of vitamin C had a 53 ml (95% CI 23 to 83) higher FEV1 and 79 ml (95% CI 42 to 116) higher FVC than those with a low vitamin C intake. Vitamin E intake showed no association with most symptoms and lung function, but had a positive association with productive cough. The intake of beta-carotene was not associated with most symptoms but had a positive association with wheeze. However, subjects with a high intake of beta-carotene had a 60 ml (95% CI 31 to 89) higher FEV1 and 75 ml (95% CI 40 to 110) higher FVC than those with a low intake of beta-carotene. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that a high intake of vitamin C or beta-carotene is protective for FEV1 and FVC compared with a low intake, but not for respiratory symptoms. SN - 0040-6376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9659349/Dietary_intake_of_antioxidant__pro__vitamins_respiratory_symptoms_and_pulmonary_function:_the_MORGEN_study_ L2 - http://thorax.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=9659349 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -