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Comparison of anion gap and strong ion gap as predictors of unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses.
Am J Vet Res. 1998 Jul; 59(7):881-7.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the accuracy of anion gap (AG) and strong ion gap (SIG) for predicting unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses.

ANIMALS

6 well-trained Standardbred horses undergoing high-intensity exercise (experimental study) and 78 horses and ponies that underwent i.v. administration of lactic acid or endotoxin, and endurance, submaximal, or high-intensity exercise.

PROCEDURE

Anion gap was calculated as AG = (Na+ + K+) - (Cl- + HCO3-), and SIG was calculated, using the simplified strong ion model, whereby SIG (mEq/L) = 2.24 x total protein (g/dl)/(1 + 10(6.65-pH)) - AG. The relation between AG or SIG and plasma lactate concentration was evaluated, using linear regression analysis.

RESULTS

Linear relations between plasma lactate concentration and AG and SIG were strong for the experimental study (r2 = 0.960 and 0.966, respectively) and the published studies (r2 = 0.914 and 0.925, respectively). The following relations were derived: AG = 1.00 x plasma lactate + 10.5; SIG = 0.99 x plasma lactate + 2.8. An AG > 15 mEq/L indicated an increased unmeasured anion concentration, whereas a SIG < -2 mEq/L indicated an increased unmeasured strong anion concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Anion gap and SIG can be used to predict plasma lactate concentration in horses. AG is accurate and clinically useful for estimating unmeasured strong ion concentration in horses with total protein concentrations within or slightly outside reference range, whereas SIG is more accurate in horses with markedly abnormal total protein concentrations and those of various ages and with various concentrations of albumin, globulin, and phosphate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9659556

Citation

Constable, P D., et al. "Comparison of Anion Gap and Strong Ion Gap as Predictors of Unmeasured Strong Ion Concentration in Plasma and Serum From Horses." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 59, no. 7, 1998, pp. 881-7.
Constable PD, Hinchcliff KW, Muir WW. Comparison of anion gap and strong ion gap as predictors of unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(7):881-7.
Constable, P. D., Hinchcliff, K. W., & Muir, W. W. (1998). Comparison of anion gap and strong ion gap as predictors of unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 59(7), 881-7.
Constable PD, Hinchcliff KW, Muir WW. Comparison of Anion Gap and Strong Ion Gap as Predictors of Unmeasured Strong Ion Concentration in Plasma and Serum From Horses. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(7):881-7. PubMed PMID: 9659556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of anion gap and strong ion gap as predictors of unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses. AU - Constable,P D, AU - Hinchcliff,K W, AU - Muir,W W,3rd PY - 1998/7/11/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1998/7/11/entrez SP - 881 EP - 7 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am J Vet Res VL - 59 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of anion gap (AG) and strong ion gap (SIG) for predicting unmeasured strong ion concentration in plasma and serum from horses. ANIMALS: 6 well-trained Standardbred horses undergoing high-intensity exercise (experimental study) and 78 horses and ponies that underwent i.v. administration of lactic acid or endotoxin, and endurance, submaximal, or high-intensity exercise. PROCEDURE: Anion gap was calculated as AG = (Na+ + K+) - (Cl- + HCO3-), and SIG was calculated, using the simplified strong ion model, whereby SIG (mEq/L) = 2.24 x total protein (g/dl)/(1 + 10(6.65-pH)) - AG. The relation between AG or SIG and plasma lactate concentration was evaluated, using linear regression analysis. RESULTS: Linear relations between plasma lactate concentration and AG and SIG were strong for the experimental study (r2 = 0.960 and 0.966, respectively) and the published studies (r2 = 0.914 and 0.925, respectively). The following relations were derived: AG = 1.00 x plasma lactate + 10.5; SIG = 0.99 x plasma lactate + 2.8. An AG > 15 mEq/L indicated an increased unmeasured anion concentration, whereas a SIG < -2 mEq/L indicated an increased unmeasured strong anion concentration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Anion gap and SIG can be used to predict plasma lactate concentration in horses. AG is accurate and clinically useful for estimating unmeasured strong ion concentration in horses with total protein concentrations within or slightly outside reference range, whereas SIG is more accurate in horses with markedly abnormal total protein concentrations and those of various ages and with various concentrations of albumin, globulin, and phosphate. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9659556/Comparison_of_anion_gap_and_strong_ion_gap_as_predictors_of_unmeasured_strong_ion_concentration_in_plasma_and_serum_from_horses_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-RRM2-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -