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Effects of concentrated electrolytes administered via a paste on fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance in horses.
Am J Vet Res. 1998 Jul; 59(7):898-903.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To test effectiveness of an electrolyte paste in correcting fluid, electrolyte and acid base alterations in response to furosemide administration.

ANIMALS

6 Standardbreds.

PROCEDURES

Horses received electrolyte paste or water only (control). The paste was given orally 3 hours after furosemide administration (1 mg/kg of body weight, IM). Water was given ad libitum soon after the paste and 3 hours after furosemide administration to treated and control groups, respectively. Paste Na+, K+, and Cl- composition was approximately 2,220, 620, and 2,840 mmol, respectively. The PCV and plasma concentrations of total protein ([TP]), [Na+], [K+], [Cl-]), and bicarbonate ([HCO3-]) were determined, and urinary fluid and electrolyte excretion, fecal water, and body weight changes were measured.

RESULTS

At the end of a 6-hour period, the paste-treated group had higher water consumption, which resulted in lower plasma [TP]; net electrolyte losses also were substantially less. With paste administration, [Na+] was approximately 2 mmol/L above a prefurosemide value of 137.3 mmol/L; control horses had values similar to the prefurosemide value. Plasma [Cl-] remained at the prefurosemide value, but values in control horses decreased by 7 mmol/L with water consumption. Plasma [K+] remained approximately 0.8 mmol/L below prefurosemide values in both groups. Venous [HCO3-] returned to prefurosemide values after paste administration, but alkalosis persisted in control horses after consumption of water only. Body weight loss was less after paste administration.

CONCLUSIONS

Administration of electrolyte paste is advantageous over water alone in restoring fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance after fluid and electrolyte loss attributable to furosemide administration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9659559

Citation

Sosa León, L A., et al. "Effects of Concentrated Electrolytes Administered Via a Paste On Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid Base Balance in Horses." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 59, no. 7, 1998, pp. 898-903.
Sosa León LA, Hodgson DR, Carlson GP, et al. Effects of concentrated electrolytes administered via a paste on fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance in horses. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(7):898-903.
Sosa León, L. A., Hodgson, D. R., Carlson, G. P., & Rose, R. J. (1998). Effects of concentrated electrolytes administered via a paste on fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance in horses. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 59(7), 898-903.
Sosa León LA, et al. Effects of Concentrated Electrolytes Administered Via a Paste On Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid Base Balance in Horses. Am J Vet Res. 1998;59(7):898-903. PubMed PMID: 9659559.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of concentrated electrolytes administered via a paste on fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance in horses. AU - Sosa León,L A, AU - Hodgson,D R, AU - Carlson,G P, AU - Rose,R J, PY - 1998/7/11/pubmed PY - 1998/7/11/medline PY - 1998/7/11/entrez SP - 898 EP - 903 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am J Vet Res VL - 59 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To test effectiveness of an electrolyte paste in correcting fluid, electrolyte and acid base alterations in response to furosemide administration. ANIMALS: 6 Standardbreds. PROCEDURES: Horses received electrolyte paste or water only (control). The paste was given orally 3 hours after furosemide administration (1 mg/kg of body weight, IM). Water was given ad libitum soon after the paste and 3 hours after furosemide administration to treated and control groups, respectively. Paste Na+, K+, and Cl- composition was approximately 2,220, 620, and 2,840 mmol, respectively. The PCV and plasma concentrations of total protein ([TP]), [Na+], [K+], [Cl-]), and bicarbonate ([HCO3-]) were determined, and urinary fluid and electrolyte excretion, fecal water, and body weight changes were measured. RESULTS: At the end of a 6-hour period, the paste-treated group had higher water consumption, which resulted in lower plasma [TP]; net electrolyte losses also were substantially less. With paste administration, [Na+] was approximately 2 mmol/L above a prefurosemide value of 137.3 mmol/L; control horses had values similar to the prefurosemide value. Plasma [Cl-] remained at the prefurosemide value, but values in control horses decreased by 7 mmol/L with water consumption. Plasma [K+] remained approximately 0.8 mmol/L below prefurosemide values in both groups. Venous [HCO3-] returned to prefurosemide values after paste administration, but alkalosis persisted in control horses after consumption of water only. Body weight loss was less after paste administration. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of electrolyte paste is advantageous over water alone in restoring fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance after fluid and electrolyte loss attributable to furosemide administration. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9659559/Effects_of_concentrated_electrolytes_administered_via_a_paste_on_fluid_electrolyte_and_acid_base_balance_in_horses_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/fluidandelectrolytebalance.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -