Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fitness and energy expenditure after strength training in obese prepubertal girls.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998; 30(7):1130-6MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a school-based, low-volume strength training program on energy expenditure, strength, and physical fitness in obese prepubertal girls.

METHODS

A longitudinal, 5-month strength training exercise program was undertaken by healthy, obese (> 95th percentile weight-for-height, N = 11) girls age 7-10 yr. The following were measured: strength by the one-repetition maximum test; fitness (VO2peak) by a treadmill exercise test; resting metabolic rate (RMR), 24-h sedentary energy expenditure (SEE), and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) by room respiration calorimetry; and total energy expenditure (TEE) by the doubly labeled water method. Physical activity energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as TEE-(RMR + 0.1.TEE) and physical activity level (PAL) as TEE/RMR. An age-matched, nonoverweight control group was measured for (VO2peak) and RMR over the same time period.

RESULTS

Strength increased by 19.6 and 20.0% in the upper and lower body (P < 0.01), respectively. (VO2peak) (mL.min-1) increased in both groups over time (P < 0.05), but not when covaried for fat-free mass (FFM) or weight. After adjusting for FFM or weight, RMR did not change, but SMR and 24-h SEE decreased significantly in the exercise group. There were no changes in nonprotein respiratory quotient or substrate oxidation. No changes in TEE, AEE, and PAL occurred, either unadjusted or adjusted for FFM or weight.

CONCLUSION

This long-term, school-based, low-volume strength training program favorably increases strength in obese prepubertal girls but does not increase their daily energy expenditure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. mtreuth@bcm.tmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9662684

Citation

Treuth, M S., et al. "Fitness and Energy Expenditure After Strength Training in Obese Prepubertal Girls." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 30, no. 7, 1998, pp. 1130-6.
Treuth MS, Hunter GR, Pichon C, et al. Fitness and energy expenditure after strength training in obese prepubertal girls. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30(7):1130-6.
Treuth, M. S., Hunter, G. R., Pichon, C., Figueroa-Colon, R., & Goran, M. I. (1998). Fitness and energy expenditure after strength training in obese prepubertal girls. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(7), pp. 1130-6.
Treuth MS, et al. Fitness and Energy Expenditure After Strength Training in Obese Prepubertal Girls. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30(7):1130-6. PubMed PMID: 9662684.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fitness and energy expenditure after strength training in obese prepubertal girls. AU - Treuth,M S, AU - Hunter,G R, AU - Pichon,C, AU - Figueroa-Colon,R, AU - Goran,M I, PY - 1998/7/15/pubmed PY - 1998/7/15/medline PY - 1998/7/15/entrez SP - 1130 EP - 6 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 30 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a school-based, low-volume strength training program on energy expenditure, strength, and physical fitness in obese prepubertal girls. METHODS: A longitudinal, 5-month strength training exercise program was undertaken by healthy, obese (> 95th percentile weight-for-height, N = 11) girls age 7-10 yr. The following were measured: strength by the one-repetition maximum test; fitness (VO2peak) by a treadmill exercise test; resting metabolic rate (RMR), 24-h sedentary energy expenditure (SEE), and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) by room respiration calorimetry; and total energy expenditure (TEE) by the doubly labeled water method. Physical activity energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as TEE-(RMR + 0.1.TEE) and physical activity level (PAL) as TEE/RMR. An age-matched, nonoverweight control group was measured for (VO2peak) and RMR over the same time period. RESULTS: Strength increased by 19.6 and 20.0% in the upper and lower body (P < 0.01), respectively. (VO2peak) (mL.min-1) increased in both groups over time (P < 0.05), but not when covaried for fat-free mass (FFM) or weight. After adjusting for FFM or weight, RMR did not change, but SMR and 24-h SEE decreased significantly in the exercise group. There were no changes in nonprotein respiratory quotient or substrate oxidation. No changes in TEE, AEE, and PAL occurred, either unadjusted or adjusted for FFM or weight. CONCLUSION: This long-term, school-based, low-volume strength training program favorably increases strength in obese prepubertal girls but does not increase their daily energy expenditure. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9662684/Fitness_and_energy_expenditure_after_strength_training_in_obese_prepubertal_girls_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9662684 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -