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The importance of preventing hepatitis C virus infection among injection drug users in the United States.

Abstract

Injection drug use is the single most important risk factor for acquiring hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Injection drug users acquire this infection rapidly after initiating injection practices, and up to 90% of them are chronically infected with HCV. HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and persons infected with HCV are at risk for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma, and they risk transmitting HCV infection to others. Preventive measures for HCV infection are limited. The heterogeneous nature of HCV and its ability to undergo rapid mutation appear to prevent the development of an effective neutralizing immune response, obstructing development of a vaccine. Prevention of HCV infection must rely on educational and programmatic efforts aimed at preventing drug use, providing substance abuse treatment for persons who inject illicit drugs, and encouraging safer injection practices. These efforts should include messages about the risk and prevention of all blood-borne pathogens, including HCV, hepatitis B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hepatitis Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9663617

Citation

Alter, M J., and L A. Moyer. "The Importance of Preventing Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Injection Drug Users in the United States." Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology : Official Publication of the International Retrovirology Association, vol. 18 Suppl 1, 1998, pp. S6-10.
Alter MJ, Moyer LA. The importance of preventing hepatitis C virus infection among injection drug users in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998;18 Suppl 1:S6-10.
Alter, M. J., & Moyer, L. A. (1998). The importance of preventing hepatitis C virus infection among injection drug users in the United States. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology : Official Publication of the International Retrovirology Association, 18 Suppl 1, pp. S6-10.
Alter MJ, Moyer LA. The Importance of Preventing Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Injection Drug Users in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998;18 Suppl 1:S6-10. PubMed PMID: 9663617.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The importance of preventing hepatitis C virus infection among injection drug users in the United States. AU - Alter,M J, AU - Moyer,L A, PY - 1998/7/15/pubmed PY - 1998/7/15/medline PY - 1998/7/15/entrez SP - S6 EP - 10 JF - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association JO - J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr. Hum. Retrovirol. VL - 18 Suppl 1 N2 - Injection drug use is the single most important risk factor for acquiring hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Injection drug users acquire this infection rapidly after initiating injection practices, and up to 90% of them are chronically infected with HCV. HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and persons infected with HCV are at risk for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma, and they risk transmitting HCV infection to others. Preventive measures for HCV infection are limited. The heterogeneous nature of HCV and its ability to undergo rapid mutation appear to prevent the development of an effective neutralizing immune response, obstructing development of a vaccine. Prevention of HCV infection must rely on educational and programmatic efforts aimed at preventing drug use, providing substance abuse treatment for persons who inject illicit drugs, and encouraging safer injection practices. These efforts should include messages about the risk and prevention of all blood-borne pathogens, including HCV, hepatitis B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. SN - 1077-9450 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9663617/The_importance_of_preventing_hepatitis_C_virus_infection_among_injection_drug_users_in_the_United_States_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=9663617.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -